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PNAS Archives

Study identifies C. diff toxin receptor, suggests new treatment approaches

Jun. 4, 2015—Vanderbilt University investigators have identified a cellular receptor for a toxin from Clostridium difficile (“C. diff”) — the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea in the United States.

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Study reveals biomarker of post-injury spinal cord function

Apr. 23, 2015—Vanderbilt University researchers have demonstrated, for the first time in a primate model, that injury disrupts neural signaling in the spinal cord and that these changes can be measured non-invasively with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

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Study explores driver behind lung cancer tumor progression

Apr. 2, 2015—Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center investigators have identified the mechanisms used by a gene and its binding protein to drive tumor growth in several forms of cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer.

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Immune response depends on force

Jan. 26, 2015—New studies explain how T-cell receptors use force to recognize and protect us against pathogens.

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New view of transporter dynamics

Oct. 23, 2014—New insights to the workings of a protein that moves neurotransmitters across the nerve cell membrane could aid the design of more effective antidepressants.

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Lymphocyte study reveals obesity clues

Oct. 16, 2014—Vanderbilt University researchers are closer to understanding the link between obesity, chronic inflammation and type 2 diabetes.

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Team spots key regulator for cholesterol production

Oct. 2, 2014—A Vanderbilt University-led research team has discovered a “master regulator” for cholesterol production and transport in the liver — a tiny piece of RNA called microRNA-223.

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New technique accelerates genome editing process

Aug. 21, 2014—It sounds like a potato chip. But CRISPR is actually the acronym for a new genome editing technique that, by many accounts, is accelerating the study of genes and disease.

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Regulating immune regulators

Jul. 17, 2014—Understanding how to control the generation of regulatory T cells could have important implications for treating autoimmunity and cancer.

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Repair protein’s DNA recognition motif

May. 23, 2014—Insights into the workings of DNA damage response proteins such as SMARCAL1 could suggest new ways to improve genome integrity and prevent cancer.

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A new way to target cancer-driver Ras

Mar. 13, 2014—Vanderbilt researchers have discovered small molecules that turn off cancerous Ras signals in a new way.

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Human and Helicobacter co-evolution

Jan. 23, 2014—by Denise Anthony A Vanderbilt University-led research team has solved a long-standing riddle: Why do people of mostly Amerindian ancestry in the Andes have a gastric cancer rate that is 25 times higher than that of fellow Colombians of mostly African descent only 124 miles away on the coast? The answer is disruption of co-evolution...

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

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