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PNAS Archives

Ancient chemical bond may aid cancer therapy: study

Dec. 19, 2013—A chemical bond discovered by Vanderbilt University scientists that is essential for animal life and which hastened the “dawn of the animal kingdom” could lead to new therapies for cancer and other diseases.

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Defusing ‘C. diff’ infection

Nov. 8, 2013—Clostridium difficile (“C. diff”) infection is a leading cause of hospital-associated diarrhea, and the frequency and severity of infections are on the rise. D. Borden Lacy, Ph.D., associate professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, and colleagues recently demonstrated that the C. difficile toxin, TcdB, induces rapid cell death of human colon cell lines and pig colonic...

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Probing mutant EGF receptor regulation

Oct. 10, 2013—Understanding the regulation of mutant EGF receptors commonly found in lung cancers could lead to new targeted therapies.

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Food variety drives overeating in mouse model of obesity syndrome

Apr. 25, 2013—Dietary variety – not high-fat or sugary foods – appears to stimulate overeating in a mouse model of an inherited obesity syndrome.

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Antibacterial protein’s molecular workings revealed

Feb. 21, 2013—Vanderbilt investigators report new insights to the workings of calprotectin, an immune system protein that “starves” bacterial pathogens of the metal nutrients they require.

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Seeing light receptor’s interactions

Jan. 18, 2013—Understanding how the main receptor for light interacts with other signaling molecules may inform new pharmaceutical development.

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Stomach bug alters tumor suppressor

Oct. 23, 2012—The stomach bug Helicobacter pylori increases forms of a protein that promote tumor development, perhaps explaining how it elevates risk for gastric cancer.

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Setting traps to probe gene function

Oct. 18, 2012—A new method for creating genetic mutations that can be activated at certain times or in specific tissues will enable studies to probe gene function.

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Receptor’s role in nutrition brain circuitry

Jul. 3, 2012—New findings point to brain circuitry that communicates about the body’s nutritional status and regulates how nutrients are mobilized.

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Dengue antibodies give vaccine leads

Apr. 27, 2012—New information may help speed development of a vaccine or treatment for dengue fever.

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‘Detangler’ binds, bends and cuts DNA

Mar. 2, 2012—New details on the DNA-cutting activity of topoisomerase II, a target of anti-cancer drugs, could lead to better chemotherapeutic agents.

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Alcohol’s molecular mediators

Jan. 23, 2012—Therapeutic agents focusing on the brain region involved in stress-induced relapse may be effective in preventing relapse in patients with alcohol use disorders.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

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