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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Archives

New target for chronic infection

Feb. 2, 2017—An enzyme in macrophage immune cells may be a good target for treating chronic infections, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

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Research sheds light on how RSV wards off potential vaccines

Oct. 20, 2016—Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of life-threatening viral pneumonia in infants worldwide, yet despite repeated efforts, scientists have been unable to develop an effective vaccine against it.

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Targeting norovirus “noxiousness”

Sep. 28, 2016—New discoveries will guide efforts to develop vaccines or antiviral agents for norovirus, the most common cause of infectious diarrhea.

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VUMC researchers seek to crack the code of neonatal sepsis

Jun. 2, 2016—Sepsis, an exaggerated and overwhelming inflammatory response to infection, is a major worldwide killer of babies in the first four weeks of life (neonatal period).

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New pain medicine from a fungus?

May. 13, 2016—Collybolide – a natural product isolated from a mushroom – is a promising candidate for the development of non-addictive pain medicines.

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Improving natural killer cancer therapy

Apr. 29, 2016—A newly discovered mechanism that helps cancer cells avoid destruction by immune system cells may improve immunotherapies.

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Fat hormone’s role in zebrafish

Mar. 8, 2016—The hormone leptin regulates glucose balance, but not fat stores, in zebrafish.

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Slight chemical change may improve TB treatments: study

Feb. 11, 2016—One small chemical change to an existing antibacterial drug results in a compound that is more effective against its target enzyme in tuberculosis, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

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Dynamics of a drug resistance transporter

Feb. 5, 2016—Vanderbilt investigators are exploring the shape changes in a multidrug transporter to understand the mechanisms of antibacterial resistance.

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Copying chromosome caps

Jan. 8, 2016—Telomeres – the caps on the end of chromosomes – are a source of stress for a particular protein involved in copying DNA, a new study reports.

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Compound developed at VUMC may delay Huntington’s disease

Oct. 29, 2015—A compound developed by researchers at Vanderbilt University can improve early symptoms and delay progression of Huntington’s disease in a mouse model of the neurodegenerative disorder.

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