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Research Archives

All of Us program launches cloud-based research platform

Jun. 18, 2020—On May 27, the All of Us Research Program launched the beta version of its cloud-based research platform, the Researcher Workbench.

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Bhave, Grome receive awards at Research Forum

Jun. 18, 2020—Gautam (Jay) Bhave, MD, PhD, assistant professor of Medicine and Cell & Developmental Biology, is the recipient of the 2020 Grant W. Liddle Award for “exemplary leadership in the promotion of scientific research” at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

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Remdesivir helps reduce COVID-19 recovery time: study

Jun. 4, 2020—The investigational antiviral drug remdesivir can shorten the time to recovery in adults hospitalized with COVID-19, according to preliminary results of a clinical trial published last month in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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VUMC research ramps up in COVID-19 transition

May. 21, 2020—As Nashville cautiously begins to emerge from its two-month-long COVID-19 Safer at Home response, so too are the labs and facilities at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

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Team uses imaging to study ways the heart is affected by coronavirus

May. 21, 2020—Researchers are using imaging and diagnostic pathology to examine postmortem hearts donated by victims of COVID-19 to gain a better understanding of how the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 affects the heart.

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VUMC Research Enterprise begins ramping up

May. 19, 2020—As Nashville cautiously begins to emerge from its two-month-long COVID-19 Safer at Home response, so too are the labs and facilities at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

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Yin receives early investigator MERIT Award from NCI

May. 14, 2020—Zhijun Yin, PhD, assistant professor of Biomedical Informatics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, has received the National Cancer Institute’s Method to Extend Research in Time Award (or MERIT Award) for Early Stage Investigators.

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Pioneering nephrologist William Stone mourned

May. 12, 2020—William J. Stone, MD, nephrologist and professor of Medicine, emeritus, who retired in December after 50 years as a member of the faculty of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, died Monday, May 11, at his home in Nashville. He was 83.

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Project seeks to help adults with TBI access social media

May. 7, 2020—With more than $2 million in funding, researchers from Vanderbilt University Medical Center are developing software to make social media platforms more accessible for adults with cognitive disabilities.

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New method captures early viral-host protein interactions

May. 7, 2020—Researchers have developed a method to identify the primary interactions between incoming viral RNA genomes and host proteins.

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Study finds AI can categorize cancer risk of lung nodules

May. 7, 2020—by Tom Wilemon Computed tomography scans for people at risk for lung cancer lead to earlier diagnoses and improve survival rates, but they can also lead to overtreatment when suspicious nodules turn out to be benign. A study published in American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine indicates that an artificial intelligence strategy can correctly assess and categorize these indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs). When compared to the conventional risk models clinicians currently use, the algorithm developed by the team of researchers in a very large dataset (15,693 nodules) reclassified IPNs into low-risk or high-risk categories in over a third of cancers and benign nodules. “These results suggest the potential clinical utility of this deep learning algorithm to revise the probability of cancer among IPNs aiming to decrease invasive procedures and shorten time to diagnosis,” said Pierre Massion, MD, Cornelius Vanderbilt Chair in Medicine at Vanderbilt University, the study’s lead author. Currently, clinicians refer to guidelines issued by the American College of Radiology and the American College of Chest Physicians. Adherence to these guidelines can be variable, and how patient cases are classified can be subjective. With the goal of providing clinicians with an unbiased assessment tool, the researchers developed an algorithm based on datasets from the National Lung Screening Trial, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Oxford University Hospital. Their study is the first to validate a risk stratification tool on multiple independent cohorts and to show reclassification performance that is significantly superior to existing risk models. With IPNs, clinicians are often faced with the dilemma of weighing whether to advise a patient to undergo an invasive surgical procedure, which may be unnecessary, against a watch-and-wait strategy, which may result in delaying needed cancer treatment. A definitive diagnosis of an IPN can take up to two years. Better assessment tools are needed by clinicians as screenings for patients at risk for lung cancer increase. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States and globally. The overall five-year survival rate is 21.7%, but it is much greater (92%) for those patients who receive an early diagnosis of stage IA1 non-small cell cancer. n

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Research team awarded $9 million to study extracellular RNA in colorectal cancer

Apr. 9, 2020—The NCI program project grant is supporting multiple projects that aim to define fundamental biological principles about extracellular RNA signaling and the development and aggressiveness of colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

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