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Vanderbilt University Medical Center Recent Achievements

  • Demand for clinical services remains at an all-time high. Inpatient admissions, outpatient visits and surgical operations are on pace to surpass all prior fiscal year totals.
  • Growth in Tech Transfer – Over the past three years, Vanderbilt University more than quadrupled earnings from its technology commercialization efforts — to more than $24.5 million during fiscal year 2013.
  • Vanderbilt University and Medical Center created an $8.6 billion economic impact on the Tennessee state economy during the most recently completed fiscal year.
  • The Vanderbilt Health Affiliated Network (VHAN) is the nation’s fastest growing provider-organized network of doctors, health systems and other health care providers. VHAN, the largest network of providers in Tennessee and surrounding states, now includes over 40 hospitals across a geographic area encompassing the entire state of Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Arkansas and Northern Mississippi.
  • For the 14th time, Vanderbilt University Hospital (VUH) named among the “Top 100 Hospitals” by Truven Health Analytics-2014.
  • VUH named among “100 Greatest Hospitals in America” by Becker’s Hospital Review in 2014.
  • VUH earned an “A” Hospital Safety Score from the Leapfrog Group, placing it among the safest hospitals in the nation.
  • VUMC’s PREDICT program received one of three 2014 Innovation Awards from Healthcare Informatics Magazine.
  • For the ninth consecutive year, VUMC was named among the nation’s 100 “most-wired” hospitals and health systems for its innovative efforts in medical technology.
  • Continued leadership role as the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Coordinating Center — Vanderbilt continues to lead 60 CTSA institutions in 30 states and the District of Columbia.
  • VUMC received a five-year, $1.2 million grant from the NIH to develop “bold and innovative approaches to broaden graduate and postdoctoral training.” Vanderbilt is one of 10 academic medical centers in the country to receive “BEST” (Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training) grants from the NIH’s Common Fund.
  • The American Medical Association (AMA) selected Vanderbilt University School of Medicine to receive a $1 million grant as one of the nation’s 11 top medical schools transforming medical education.
  • With the election of 18 new fellows in 2013, Vanderbilt University now has 94 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) fellows among its current and emeritus faculty and staff. Half — 47 — have been elected during the last three years, reflecting remarkable momentum and growth of the University’s academic reputation.
  • Vanderbilt University now has 27 current faculty members who have been elected by their peers to the National Academies. Twenty are members of the Institute of Medicine; seven are members of the National Academy of Sciences or the National Academy of Engineering.
  • VUMC has received an 18-month, $6.9 million award to set up a Clinical Data Research Network (CDRN) that can reach millions of patients and speed the translation of research findings into clinical practice. The award will establish the Mid-South CDRN. It is one of 11 such awards recently announced by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute.
  • The Vanderbilt Vaccine Research Program received funding renewal from the NIH to continue its role as one of the nation’s Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units. Vanderbilt has the potential to receive funding up to $135 million per year from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) over a seven-year period.
  • Vanderbilt researchers, in collaboration with four other institutions, performed the first large-scale phenome-wide association study using electronic medical records to identify new disease associations.
  • Vanderbilt was awarded a Cooperative Agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Army Research Office (ARO) that is worth up to $16.5 million over five years. The grant will allow researchers to develop mass spectrometry methods for quickly determining how potentially toxic agents, including drugs, affect human cells.
  • A Vanderbilt Brain Institute study revealed that children with autism spectrum disorders have trouble integrating sight and sound. The study is the first to illustrate the link and strongly suggests these deficits hamper social and communication skills.