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Predators help fight childhood cancer

Aug. 1, 2013, 9:58 AM

The Nashville Predators recently presented a $131,000 check to the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. On hand were, from left, Predators president/COO Sean Henry, Emmanuel John Volanakis, M.D., Predators forward Matt Halischuk, Debra Friedman, M.D., Meg Rush, M.D., Gnash, patients Gigi Pasley and Brooklyn Morely, and John W. Brock III, M.D. (photo by John Russell)

The Nashville Predators Foundation recently presented a $131,000 donation to the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt as part of the organization’s continued commitment to support cancer research.

The gift supports an endowed fund established by the Predators, which helps researchers at Children’s Hospital study the molecular basis of childhood cancer and develop novel treatment approaches to improve outcomes for children.

“We are overwhelmed by the Nashville Predators generosity,” said Luke Gregory, chief executive officer for Children’s Hospital. “Children’s Hospital is committed to identifying cures and better treatments for childhood cancer, and this donation will certainly have a positive impact in this regard.”

Vanderbilt and the Predators first became strategic partners when they joined forces in 2008, with Vanderbilt signing on as the Predators integrated health care provider. Throughout the five-year partnership, the Predators have donated more than $700,000 and countless hours of community service.

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