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Grant to support team-based compassionate care training

Aug. 1, 2013, 10:05 AM

The Vanderbilt Program in Interprofessional Learning (VPIL) has received a $183,000 Baptist Healing Trust (BHT) grant to support team-based training called “Coaching for Compassionate Care: Developing a new model for health professions education.”

VPIL is a collaboration of the Vanderbilt Schools of Nursing and Medicine, the Lipscomb and Belmont Universities Colleges of Pharmacy, and Tennessee State University’s Master of Social Work program.

VPIL currently places 21 teams, consisting of one student from each discipline, into clinical settings where they focus on patient-centered care, learn more about health systems and perform quality improvement projects. Through the support from BHT, the program is also focusing on teaching health coaching skills as one method of adding value to patient care.

Heather Davidson, Ph.D., director of Program Development for VPIL, said the grant represents the growing emphasis throughout health care on a team-based approach.

“VPIL students learn from each other and from patients to accelerate their development of interprofessional care practices. We believe this will be a great benefit to patients in the future,” Davidson said.

Baptist Healing Trust grant recipients include nonprofit organizations from 40 counties in Middle Tennessee that focus on physical health, mental health, recovery from alcohol and drug abuse or healing from abuse, neglect and violence.

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