Skip to main content

Lehmann, Walker elected to American Pediatric Society

Feb. 6, 2014, 9:38 AM

Christoph Lehmann, M.D., professor of Pediatrics and Biomedical Informatics, and Lynn Walker, Ph.D., professor of Pediatrics and director of the Division of Adolescent Medicine and Young Adult Health, have been elected to the American Pediatric Society (APS).

Christoph Lehmann, M.D.

Lehmann is recognized for his research in applied clinical informatics, which focuses on the use of health information technology and improved patient care, safety and outcomes.

He is also known for his work developing, implementing and evaluating several health IT tools that effectively reduce provider errors, minimize costs, decrease unnecessary medication usage and improve safety.

For more than 20 years Walker has maintained National Institutes of Health funding for her research examining predictors of outcomes in adolescents with chronic pain.

She has authored more than 90 peer-reviewed publications. Most recently, Walker’s study suggesting children with chronic stomach pains are at high risk for anxiety disorders in adolescence and young adulthood was published in the journal Pediatrics.

The APS, founded in 1888, is the oldest honorary society for academic pediatricians.
Members are recognized for leadership, teaching, research and contributions at a national and international level.

Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

more