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Ben Folds featured at ‘Music and Mind’ symposium

May. 28, 2014, 1:08 PM


UPDATE: THIS EVENT IS AT CAPACITY. Email beth.sims@vanderbilt.edu to get on the wait list.

“Music and the Mind,” a unique symposium that includes a performance by critically acclaimed singer-songwriter Ben Folds, will be held Thursday, June 12, at 7 p.m. in Ingram Hall of the Vanderbilt Blair School of Music.

Ben Folds (courtesy of the artist)

Connections between neuroscience, psychology and music will be explored during a panel discussion featuring:

  • McGill University neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, author of This is Your Brain on Music;
  • Marianne Ploger, associate professor of music perception and cognition at Vanderbilt; and
  • David Zald, professor of psychology and psychiatry at Vanderbilt.

Sponsored by the Vanderbilt Brain Institute, the performance and discussion will begin at 7 p.m.

Before the symposium, a research “exposition” will be held in the Ingram Hall lobby beginning at 5 p.m.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Reserve your spot now.

Download the flyer for directions and parking.

Event Sponsors:
Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences
Blair School of Music
College of Arts and Science
The Curb Center for Art, Enterprise, and Public Policy
School of Engineering
Peabody College of education and human development
Vanderbilt Conte Center for Neuroscience Research
Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development

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