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VKC debuts interdisciplinary research lecture series Sept. 3

Aug. 28, 2014, 9:15 AM

The Vanderbilt Kennedy Center is launching is a new educational series that will focus on the complexities of conducting interdisciplinary research and clinical trials that involve behavioral, environmental and pharmaceutical interventions.

The Clinical & Translational Research in Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities Lecture Series aims to promote discussion among behavioral/educational and biomedical researchers with the long-term goal of developing multimodal treatments for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), including learning disabilities, genetic syndromes and autism spectrum disorder. Lectures are intended for clinicians, researchers, trainees and students. Community members are welcome as well.

Lectures will be held one Wednesday per month from noon-1 p.m. in Room 241 of the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center/One Magnolia Circle Building on the Peabody campus.

The first lecture will be held Wednesday, Sept. 3. Gordon Bernard, M.D., associate vice chancellor for Clinical and Translational Research and director of the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (VICTR), will be speaking with Paul Harris, Ph.D., associate professor of Biomedical Informatics and Biomedical Engineering and director of Office of Research Informatics, on “What’s New, What’s Next? Putting VUMC Clinical Trial Resources to Work in IDD Interventions.”

For more information on the Clinical & Translational Research lectures, click here or contact Elizabeth Turner at 322-8240 or elizabeth.turner@vanderbilt.edu.

Co-sponsors for the Clinical & Translational Research Lecture Series include the Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Eunice Kennedy Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD), Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) Training Program, Treatment and Research Institute for Autism Spectrum Disorders (TRIAD) and VICTR.

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