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Clayton to co-chair National Academies’ review committee

Sep. 3, 2015, 9:09 AM

Ellen Clayton, M.D., J.D., the Craig-Weaver Professor of Pediatrics and professor of Law and Health Policy at Vanderbilt University, has been selected to serve as co-chair of the National Academies’ Report Review Committee (RRC).

Ellen Wright Clayton, M.D., J.D.

Clayton will begin her four-year term in July 2016. The RRC is comprised of co-chairs from the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine, and its role is to monitor and rigorously review, on a continuous basis, reports prepared by National Academies’ committees to ensure the quality of work that is produced.

“The reports of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provide essential advice to the nation,” said Clayton. “It is a real honor to be the first member of the National Academy of Medicine to serve as a co-chair of the Report Review Committee, which works with peer reviewers to ensure the excellence of these reports.”

An internationally respected leader in the field of law and genetics, Clayton also is co-founder of the Vanderbilt Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society. She is also known for being active in debates on ethical and policy issues surrounding research and the clinical care of children.

A graduate of Duke University, Clayton received a master’s degree from Stanford, her law degree from Yale and her M.D. from Harvard. She joined the Vanderbilt faculty in 1988, has published two books and more than 150 scholarly articles and chapters on the intersection of law, medicine and public health.

The National Academies’ RRC appointment adds to an already extensive list of past and ongoing professional service roles Clayton has held over the years within Vanderbilt as well as locally, nationally and internationally for organizations that include the Institute of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration.

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