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Symposium highlights 90th anniversary of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics

Nov. 24, 2015, 9:19 AM

The Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics (MPB) will celebrate its 90th anniversary on Dec. 3 with a day-long symposium entitled “Mus musculus (Latin for lab mouse): What does the future hold?”

The symposium will begin at 9 a.m. in the Vanderbilt Student Life Center. Speakers include:

• Morrie Birnbaum, M.D., Ph.D., chief scientific officer, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Research Unit, Pfizer;

• Benjamin Ebert, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School;

• Richard Flavell, Ph.D., chair of Immunobiology, Yale School of Medicine;

• Bryan Roth, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and

• Debra Silver, Ph.D., assistant professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University.

Formerly known as the Physiology Department, MPB traces its history back to the reorganization of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 1925. It is ranked number one among physiology departments nationwide in National Institutes of Health funding.

Registration is required. To register go here.

For more information, contact Colette Bosley in the office of department chairman Roger Cone, Ph.D., at colette.k.bosley@vanderbilt.edu.

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