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Hasty selected to participate in academic medicine program for women

Jun. 9, 2016, 9:48 AM

Alyssa Hasty, Ph.D., an obesity researcher at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, has been selected to participate in the 22nd class of the Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women.

The year-long, part-time fellowship, based at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, is the only program in North America dedicated to preparing women for senior leadership roles in academic health centers. This year’s class includes 53 faculty members from across the country and one from Canada.

Alyssa Hasty, Ph.D.
Alyssa Hasty, Ph.D.

“I am honored to be a part of the 2016-2017 ELAM class, and hope to serve Vanderbilt well with the leadership skills I hone over the coming year,” said Hasty, professor and director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics.

Hasty’s research focuses on understanding immunologic mechanisms by which obesity leads to an increased risk of metabolic diseases. She is a research health scientist at the Nashville Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and directs the Obesity, Metabolism and Nutrient Absorption Program in the Vanderbilt Digestive Disease Research Center.

Established in 1995, the ELAM program is named for the mother of the late Philadelphia-area philanthropist Patricia Kind.

Many of the program’s more than 1,000 alumnae are in the upper echelons of health care leadership. Last fall, 14 of 31 women deans at accredited U.S. medical schools and seven of 13 women deans at U.S. dental schools were ELAM alumnae, program officials said.

Thirteen alumnae are current faculty members of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. They are listed below by their medical school or Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) title and fellowship year:

  • Shari Barkin, M.D., M.S.H.S., director, Division of General Pediatrics (2007-2008);
  • Colleen Brophy, M.D., professor of Surgery (1998-1999);
  • Nancy Brown, M.D., chair, Department of Medicine (2005-2006);
  • Ellen Wright Clayton, M.D., J.D., Craig-Weaver Professor of Pediatrics (1999-2000);
  • Suanne Daves, M.D., vice chair, Pediatric Anesthesiology (1996-1997);
  • Tina Hartert, M.D., MPH, vice president for Translational Science, VUMC (2010-2011);
  • Katherine Hartmann, M.D., Ph.D., associate dean, Clinical and Translational Scientist Development (2005-2006);
  • Mary Hooks, M.D., MBA, associate professor of Surgery (2010-2011);
  • Julia Lewis, M.D., professor of Medicine (2002-2003);
  • Beth Malow, M.D., director, Division of Sleep Disorders (2014-2015);
  • Ann Richmond, Ph.D., Ingram Professor of Cancer Research (2002-2003);
  • Consuelo Wilkins, M.D., MSCI, executive director, Meharry-Vanderbilt Alliance (2014-2015); and
  • Mary Zutter, Ph.D., vice president for Integrative Diagnostics, VUMC (2006-2007).

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