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Fashion show to benefit VICC ovarian cancer research

Sep. 15, 2016, 9:18 AM

Fall fashions for women will be on display during the 4th Annual Chic Awearness Fashion Show promoting ovarian cancer awareness and research. The event, to be held Monday, Sept. 26, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., will benefit the T.J. Martell Foundation, which supports ovarian cancer research at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC).

The fashion show will be held at PRIMA restaurant, 700 12th Ave. S. in Nashville.

Chic Awearness was founded in 2013 by ovarian cancer survivor and activist Marci Houff.

Ovaries and fallopian tubes are part of the female reproductive system. Cancers of the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and the peritoneum (lining of the abdominal cavity) are the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women in the U.S.

Ronald Alvarez, M.D., chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Vanderbilt, is scheduled to be a featured speaker at the annual fundraiser. A leading expert in the field of clinical gene therapy for ovarian and cervical cancers, Alvarez’ research interests include the development of novel therapies for ovarian cancer, along with screening and prevention strategies for cervical cancer.

Another VICC physician/scientist deeply involved in ovarian cancer research is Dineo Khabele, M.D., associate professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Cancer Biology. Khabele, who treats patients and operates a research laboratory, said the Chic Awearness event and the support from the T.J. Martell Foundation are vitally important for the research program.

“We are honored to join in partnership with ovarian cancer survivors and advocates to enhance awareness about ovarian cancer and raise money for ovarian cancer research. As co-founder of the Vanderbilt Ovarian Cancer Alliance (VOCAL), a multi-disciplinary group of investigators, I am excited about the important research being done here at Vanderbilt to develop new personalized approaches to diagnose and treat ovarian cancer. Our mission is to take discoveries made in the lab to the clinic as quickly as possible. Funding from Chic Awearness and the T.J. Martell Foundation will help fill gaps in federal funding and speed up the pace of discovery,” Khabele said.

For more information about tickets, visit www. http://www.tjmartell.org/upcoming-events/chic-awearness or call 615-256-2002.

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