Skip to main content

NSAIDs, genetics and miscarriage

Sep. 20, 2017, 10:00 AM

NSAIDs – anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin and ibuprofen – affect signaling pathways important in achieving and maintaining pregnancy. Studies of their impact on miscarriage risk, however, have produced mixed results.

Digna Velez Edwards, Ph.D., and colleagues evaluated genetic variation in NSAID metabolism and related pathways and miscarriage risk in a group of 600 European-American women enrolled in the Right from the Start prospective cohort.

The researchers identified an association between a variant in the prostacyclin synthase gene, PGIS, and miscarriage risk that was modified by NSAID use during early pregnancy. Among women with the PGIS variant, NSAID users were protected from miscarriage and non-NSAID users were at increased risk. The variant was also associated with increased levels of a pro-inflammatory prostaglandin.

The findings, published in Scientific Reports, suggest the potential for using genetic information to guide interventions that prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes. If verified, the results support NSAID treatment in women with the PGIS variant to reduce risk of miscarriage.

This research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (HD043883, HD049675, HD043483, RR024975, CA095103, AT004660, CA121060).

Send suggestions for articles to highlight in Aliquots and any other feedback about the column to aliquots@vanderbilt.edu

Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

more