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Cancer Center’s annual scientific retreat set for May 1

Apr. 22, 2019, 1:43 PM

 

by Tom Wilemon

The varying roles that signaling molecules play in progression of cancer is the focus of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center 20th Annual Scientific Retreat when some of the nation’s top experts will speak about “Signal Transduction in Cancer Initiation, Progression and Treatment.”

The event, which is open to the public, will be from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wednesday, May 1, at the Vanderbilt University Student Life Center, 310 25th Ave. South. Registration is free, but attendees should register by April 26.

“This year’s retreat promises to reveal how recent breakthroughs in basic science laboratories are being translated to the clinic through the development of bold new approaches for cancer therapies,” said Ann Richmond, Ingram Professor Cancer Research and associate director for Education for Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC).

In addition to hearing from experts in the field, the retreat will feature a poster session and award talks from the VICC Postdoctoral Scholar of the Year and the VICC Graduate Student of the Year.

Featured speakers will include:

  • Channing Der, PhD, Sarah Graham Kenan Distinguished Professor, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, speaking on “Drugging ‘undruggable’ RAS: mission possible?”
  • Tony Hunter, PhD, Renato Dulbecco Chair in Cancer Research and deputy director of the Salk Institute Cancer Center, speaking on “New signal transduction targets for cancer therapy.”
  • Ethan Lee, MD, PhD, professor of Cell and Developmental Biology and Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, speaking on “A new role for the tumor suppressor APC in the Wnt pathway.”
  • Deborah Morrison, PhD, chief of Laboratory Cell and Developmental Signaling and senior investigator and head of the Cellular Growth Mechanisms Section for the National Cancer Institute, speaking on “New approaches to inhibit Raf kinase signaling: the details DO matter!”

In addition to the lectures, a research competition will take place for poster presenters. All cancer-related abstracts are welcome. The deadline to register and/or submit an abstract is Thursday, April 25, at 11:59 pm. Posters must not be any larger than four feet by four feet. For poster prizes, the researcher must be present to win. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three winners in each group.

For details and to register for the event, visit https://redcap.vanderbilt.edu/surveys/?s=9TTEMR37WF.

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