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New Physician Spotlight

Aug. 5, 2019, 9:34 AM

 

Peter Morone, MD, MSCI

Assistant Professor

Department of Neurological Surgery

Peter Morone, MD, MSCI

 

Dr. Peter Morone, MD, has joined the Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) surgical faculty after completing his residency at VUMC. He began seeing patients July 1.

“Dr. Morone is an ideal match for our department,” said Reid C. Thompson, MD, William F. Meacham Professor of Neurological Surgery and chair of the department. “He is a gifted surgeon with a great passion for technical excellence. He is focused on treating patients with complex skull base tumors – some of the most challenging neurosurgical  problems. He is equally passionate about research and training the next generation of neurological surgeons.”

Dr. Morone’s clinical interests include neurological oncology, skull-base neurosurgery and all aspects of complex cranial neurosurgery. His research interests include neuro-oncology outcomes and delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. He is also interested in neuroanatomy and using biostatistics to synthesize information from large datasets.

Dr. Morone has a strong interest in education and has developed a neurosurgery anatomy curriculum. Additionally, he has developed multiple neurosurgical simulation applications for iOS and Android-based devices which are used by clinicians worldwide.

“I am thrilled to start as faculty at VUMC,” said Morone. “The patients, residents and faculty make this one of the BEST hospitals in the US. I look forward to collaborating with others to strengthen and advance the field of skull base neurosurgery.”

Dr. Morone received his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. He attended medical school and interned at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana, where he was inducted into Alpha Omega Alpha. During his VUMC residency, Dr. Morone completed an enfolded fellowship in skull base neurosurgery and a Master of Science in Clinical Investigation.

He is a member of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the American Association of Neurological Surgeons.

Patients can be referred to Dr. Morone by calling the Vanderbilt Neurosurgery Clinic, 615-322-7417.

 

VUMC is continually adding new faculty members who bring a wealth of clinical expertise, research talent and academic leadership to our institution. These individuals come from a wide variety of disciplines and backgrounds, all of which support VUMC’s well-deserved reputation when it comes to providing the best, evidence-based care for our patients.

Select new faculty will be introduced each month in MyVUMC, with the goal of fostering connections and collaborations with the new talent.

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