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VUMC honored for patient safety initiatives

Oct. 18, 2012, 10:04 AM

Vanderbilt University Medical Center is a 2012 recipient of the Leadership in Safety Award from CNA, the seventh largest U.S. commercial insurance carrier.

The award was presented Tuesday during a ceremony at the Eskind Biomedical Library’s Executive Board Room.

CNA’s Leadership in Safety Award recognizes those who take the initiative to create a safer, more productive work place, encourage behaviors that prevent unsafe events and prepare for potential disruptions in health care delivery.

“The achievements being recognized can be attributed to the Vanderbilt community’s commitment to patient safety, quality of care and risk prevention initiatives,” said Sandy Bledsoe, assistant vice chancellor for Risk and Insurance Management.

Bledsoe said VUMC is committed to continually improving the patient experience, with a strong emphasis on early identification of threats to safety, improving systems of care and promoting professionalism among all team members.

“Vanderbilt has been honored to contribute to national efforts involving early identification of physicians at increased risk for malpractice experience, effective disclosure of adverse events and medical errors and processes designed to understand those factors that contribute to adverse outcomes in both the hospital and outpatient settings,” Bledsoe said. “We are pleased to have our efforts acknowledged by CNA.”

CNA Underwriting Director Eric Paynter said the carrier considers Vanderbilt to be a role model among U.S. health systems with regards to these important health care issues.
“Vanderbilt has taken a proactive approach to safety, educating team members about common risks, identifying problem areas in advance and implementing novel steps to improve patient safety,” Paynter said.

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