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Pharmacology forum to explore neurobiology of criminal behavior

Apr. 4, 2013, 9:43 AM

“The Neurobiology of Criminals” is the theme of the 22nd annual Joel G. Hardman Student-Invited Pharmacology Forum, April 11 in 208 Light Hall.

The forum will begin at 9:15 a.m. The speakers and their topics are:

• Michael Koenigs, Ph.D., assistant professor of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison — “The neurobiology of psychopathy: insights from brain imaging and implications for law.”

• Nelly Alia-Klein, Ph.D., professor of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine — “Genes, brain and behavior in human aggression.”

• David Goldman, M.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Neurogenetics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism — “Why some people fight and drink: Genomics-based discovery of stop codons leading to impulsivity, alcohol preference and other behaviors.”

The 2013 Teaching Award will be presented by the Pharmacology graduate students at 1:30 p.m., and the forum will conclude at 2:35 p.m.

The forum is named for Joel Hardman, Ph.D., professor of Pharmacology, Emeritus, who chaired the Department of Pharmacology from 1975 to 1990.

For a complete schedule, pull down the Events/Seminars menu on the Pharmacology Department website and click on the Hardman forum.

For more information, contact Karen Gieg, Pharmacology Graduate Program Coordinator, at 322-1182 or karen.gieg@vanderbilt.edu.

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