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VUMC recognized for support of LGBT business

Apr. 18, 2013, 9:53 AM

Vanderbilt University Medical Center and two of its employees have been recognized for contributions to the LGBT business community in Nashville.

The Medical Center received the 2013 Nashville Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Chamber of Commerce (NGLBTCC) Business Award for Corporate Diversity.

The award, the highest honor presented by the NGLBTCC, recognizes businesses that demonstrate a strong commitment to improving the culture and climate for LGBT employees and the LGBT community.

Kristen Eckstrand, M.D., Ph.D., candidate at the School of Medicine and co-director of the Vanderbilt Program for LGBTI (I, intersex) Health, accepted the award on the Medical Center’s behalf.

Vanderbilt’s Jesse Ehrenfeld, M.D., MPH, and Vic Sorrell were individually recognized for their involvement with the Nashville LGBT community.

Ehrenfeld, associate professor of Anesthesiology and Biomedical Informatics and co-leader of the Vanderbilt Program for LGBTI Health with Eckstrand, received the Samuel L. Felker Business Leader of the Year award.

The award recognizes business and professional success, as well as leadership in the community and serving as a positive role model.

The Out & About newspaper and BNA Talent Inspirational Person of the Year Award was presented to Sorrell, an HIV educator, advocate and coordinator of Community Outreach and Recruitment at VUMC’s HIV Vaccine Program.

Sorrell was chosen from more than 50 applicants based on his efforts in HIV education and prevention.

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