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TB skin testing resumes for VU faculty, staff

May. 9, 2013, 3:24 PM

Routine TB skin testing, offered through Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Occupational Health Clinic, has resumed, effective immediately.

Faculty and staff who were unable to receive an annual or new employee TB skin test during a temporary suspension can now receive skin testing at one of several scheduled TB skin testing events.

Beginning Monday, May 13, through Thursday, May 16, there will be express testing locations at the Occupational Health Clinic on the sixth floor of the Medical Arts Building from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. A roaming cart will be circulating through Vanderbilt University Hospital on Wednesday, May 15, and through Medical Center East and the Critical Care Towers on Monday, May 20.

Testing will also be offered at Vanderbilt Health One Hundred Oaks on Thursday, May 16, and at Williamson County locations on Friday, May 17.

Faculty and staff can also visit the Occupational Health Clinic at 1211 21st Ave S., Suite 640, Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. No appointment is necessary.

Routine skin testing of health care workers at VUMC was suspended on April 10 due to an unprecedented shortage of the TB skin testing solution, Tubersol. The shortage was affecting hospitals and health departments across the nation as well as other agencies outside of health care such as the military and correctional institutions.

The shortage occurred during VUMC’s annual job performance evaluation season, which requires that employees be up-to-date on all immunizations and safety compliances.
Due to the shortage, there will be a grace period to give people time to get up to date, and after June 4 TB compliance reporting will resume as usual.

For more information contact Occupational Health at occupational.health.clinic@vanderbilt.edu or call 936-0955. You can review testing locations and times at http://occupationalhealth.vanderbilt.edu.

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