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VUMC mourns loss of Radiology investigator Riddle

Jun. 22, 2016, 1:57 PM

William Riddle, Ph.D., research assistant professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, died June 8 following a long battle with multiple sclerosis. He was 65.

William Riddle, Ph.D.
William Riddle, Ph.D.

After receiving his Engineering degree from Vanderbilt in 1973 Dr. Riddle spent his early career as a programmer and analyst in the Pulmonary Division of the Department of Physiology and Internal Medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. He returned to Vanderbilt in 1985, earned his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering in 1988 and joined the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, where he worked until his retirement in 2015.

Dr. Riddle’s research contributed to the development of now-common clinical diagnostic procedures, including X-ray mammography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In recent years his work was devoted to developing new quantitative tools for understanding brain growth and development in pediatric patients.

He also devoted his energies to extending these same techniques to provide physicians with a tool that could monitor the progression of degenerative brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Riddle was known as a dedicated researcher and teacher, always available to encourage and support others.

“It is with deep sorrow that we note the passing of our friend and colleague, Dr. Bill Riddle,” said Reed Omary, M.D., M.S., Carol D. and Henry P. Pendergrass Professor and chair of the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences.

“Bill was an extremely courageous individual with a keen sense of humor and a genuine love for people. He was greatly admired by all who knew him.”

Dr. Riddle is survived by his son, Patrick Riddle of Nashville, and his sister, Kay Thomas, of Dallas.

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