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Richmond receives legacy award from Society for Leukocyte Biology

Dec. 12, 2019, 10:30 AM

 

by Tom Wilemon

Ann Richmond, PhD, Ingram Professor of Cancer Research, is the 2019 recipient of the Society for Leukocyte Biology Legacy Award.

Ann Richmond, PhD

The award, which has been given annually since 1980, is the highest honor the society bestows upon one of its members. Richmond, professor of Pharmacology and Dermatology, accepted the award in Boston on Nov. 16 at the society’s annual meeting.

She serves as associate director for Research Education at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and is the director of the Program in Cancer Biology at Vanderbilt University. Richmond’s postdoctoral work led to the purification, cloning and characterization of MGSA, now known as the chemokine, CXCL1 and her lab made many significant discoveries of the role of chemokines in inflammation, wound healing, cancer progression and metastasis over the last 35 years.

She has previously been awarded the William S. Middleton Award for Outstanding Achievements in Biomedical Research from the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Charles R. Park Award for Outstanding Contributions to Research for Basic Research into Physiology and Pathophysiology, and the Delores Shockley Partnership Award.

She serves on the editorial board or is a reviewer for several medical journals related to cancer research. Richmond organized the first Chemokine Gordon Research Conference in 1994. She is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Society for Cell Biology, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, International Cytokine and Interferon Society and Melanoma Research Society. She is a fellow of the American Association for Advancement of Science. She is past president of the Society for Leukocyte Biology.

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