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Symposium to focus on stem cell transplant, cellular therapies

Feb. 20, 2020, 8:58 AM

 

by Tom Wilemon

New therapies that re-engineer patients’ T-cells to target cancer and advances in stem cell transplantations that make it easier for patients to be matched with donors are among the topics at an upcoming symposium in Nashville.

The Vanderbilt Stem Cell Transplant and Cellular Therapy Symposium takes place from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., March 28, at Loews Vanderbilt, 2100 West End Ave.

“This inaugural event promises to address the knowledge gap in the application of these novel therapies in the management of malignant and non-malignant disorders,” said Adetola Kassim, MBBS, MS, professor of Medicine and medical director of the Vanderbilt Stem Cell Transplant and Cellular Therapy Program.

Organized by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, the symposium is intended for hematologists/oncologists, advanced practice providers and their staffs, including fellows in training. It has been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit.

Frederick Locke, MD

The featured speakers are Frederick Locke, MD, program co-leader of immunology and leader of the Immune Cell Therapy initiative at Moffitt Cancer Center, and Richard John Jones, MD, director of the Bone Marrow Transplantation Program and co-director of the Hematologic Malignancies Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins.

Locke will speak about “CAR T for Lymphoma: a success story.” Jones will speak about “Haploidentical versus Matched Donor Transplant in Hematological Malignancies.”

Richard John Jones, MD

Other topics and speakers include:

  • “Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (and Myelodysplastic Syndromes,” Stephen Strickland, MD, MSCI, of Vanderbilt.
  • “New insights into the Management of AML and MDS Relapses after Transplant,” Michael Byrne, DO, of Vanderbilt
  • “Best of TCT 2020,” discuss best abstracts and presentations at this year’s Transplant and Cellular Therapy symposium in Orlando, Florida. Kathryn (Katie) Culos, PharmD BCOP,
  • “Overview of Cellular Therapy at Vanderbilt,” Olalekan Oluwole, MBBS, MPH, of Vanderbilt
  • “CAR T for Pediatric and Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A New Hope,” William Donnellan, MD, of Sarah Cannon Blood Cancer Network
  • “CAR T for Multiple Myeloma: Success and Challenges,” Frank Cornell, MD, MS, of Vanderbilt
  • “Cellular Therapy for Non-Hematologic Malignances: The Road Ahead,” Wade Iams, MD, of Vanderbilt
  • “Other Immunotherapeutic Approaches in Hematologic Malignancies,” Bhagirathbhai Dholaria, MBBS, of Vanderbilt
  • “Pros and Cons of Transplant and Cellular Therapy in the Elderly,” Reena Jayani, MD, of Vanderbilt
  • “Long-Term Follow-Up Post Transplant: More Than a Decade of Experience,” Bipin Savani, of Vanderbilt
  • “Cellular Therapy – Trials and Tribulations: A Patient’s Journey,” Brittany Baer, RN, BSN, of Vanderbilt
  • “Curative therapies for sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies,” Adetola Kassim, of Vanderbilt
  • “Transplant approach to patients with immunodeficiency disorders,” James Connelly

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