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Gelbard’s airway disease efforts honored by Triological Society

Feb. 27, 2020, 9:05 AM

 

by Kelsey Herbers

Alexander Gelbard, MD, associate professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and co-director of the Vanderbilt Complex Airway Center, was recently awarded The Edmund Prince Fowler Award for his candidate thesis to the Triological Society.

Alexander Gelbard, MD

The society is the oldest American academic society in otolaryngology. The award recognizes excellence in basic science research and has been given annually since 1971.

“Receiving this award is a tremendous honor for me. In addition to being a decorated colonel in World War I and founder of the first hearing center in the United States, Dr. Fowler was a prodigious researcher and talented surgeon,” said Gelbard.

“Receiving the award is so special because it uniquely recognizes the importance of translating scientific insight into clinical benefit for affected patients.”

Gelbard’s thesis explores a rare airway disease characterized by an unexplained narrowing of the windpipe. The findings increase understanding of why scarring may occur in the airway and suggests the airway may play a larger role in immune surveillance than originally believed.

“Dr. Gelbard has created both a system to harvest information about a rare condition as well as the research to further understand the etiology and treatment for the condition. We are delighted that he received such a prestigious recognition,” said Roland Eavey, MD, Guy M. Maness Professor and chair of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery and director of the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center.

Gelbard will be elected as a fellow during the organization’s annual meeting in April.

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