Skip to main content

VUMC’s Smith named president of the Tennessee Medical Association

Sep. 3, 2020, 8:55 AM

 

by Nancy Humphrey

M. Kevin Smith, MD, PhD, MMHC, assistant professor of Clinical Medicine, has been named president of the Tennessee Medical Association (TMA). He will serve as president through May 2021.

M. Kevin Smith, MD, PhD, MMHC

The TMA is the state’s largest professional association for physicians, open to all medical doctors or doctors of osteopathy licensed to practice in Tennessee and serving more than 9,500 physicians statewide.

He is the 166th physician elected to TMA’s highest office since its founding in 1830.

“I am truly honored and humbled to serve as president of the Tennessee Medical Association,” Smith said. “The opportunity to represent more than 9,500 of my peers and to advocate for our patients is definitely one of the highlights of my life.

“My goal will be to encourage all physicians to join with the TMA as their voice for improving our ability to provide the best care for patients in this rapidly changing health care landscape.”

In this role, Smith will serve as the organization’s public representative and help guide its work in collaborating with fellow physicians, legislators, patients, and nearly 50 component medical societies across Tennessee. He will also hold a seat on the TMA Board of Trustees.

Smith is a graduate of Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and completed his internal medicine residency at Vanderbilt as well. He also has earned Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Management in Health Care degrees from Vanderbilt. He is a prior president of the Nashville Academy of Medicine and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians.

Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer.  Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Momentum

Betsy Williams has firsthand advice for parents on the fence about whether their adolescent children should be vaccinated for the common human papilloma virus (HPV), which can lead to six types of cancer. Don’t hesitate. Do it.

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Keeping pace: Nashville, once a mid-size city with a Southern small-town feel, is experiencing explosive growth.

VUMC campus

VUMC campus

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine entrance

more