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Mencio named president-elect of orthopaedic surgery board

Nov. 18, 2020, 3:38 PM

Gregory Mencio, MD

Gregory Mencio, MD, Neil E. Green, MD Professor of Orthopaedics and chief of Pediatric Orthopaedics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, has been elected president-elect of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS).

The one-year term will prepare him for his role as president of the board in October 2021.

“It’s a great honor to be chosen by my fellow board directors to serve as president-elect,” said Mencio. “By setting standards for education, practice and conduct, the ABOS strives to ensure the safe, ethical and effective practice of orthopaedic surgery. I am humbled by the opportunity to serve as president of this distinguished group of orthopaedic leaders and look forward to the challenges.

“As president, I will do my best to uphold the board’s guiding principle to ‘do the right thing’ to serve the best interests of the public and our profession. I plan to continue to work proactively with our talented directors and staff to ensure that our certification processes are practical and relevant to practicing orthopaedic surgeons and of the highest standards to ensure public confidence.”

Mencio was elected to the ABOS board of directors in 2015, and he has served as chair of ABOS’ credentials and research committees.

“The selection of Dr. Mencio in this incredibly influential role is a well-deserved honor,” said Rick Wright, MD, Dan Spengler, MD Professor and chair of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and immediate past president of the ABOS. “This is a critical position, as the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery sets the educational and professional standards for orthopaedic residents and surgeons as well as evaluates the qualifications and competence of orthopaedic surgeons.

“There is none better to lead this work. He follows a rich Vanderbilt history with the board as the fifth president to come from alumni or faculty in the last 20 years, including Dr. Dan Spengler and Dr. Neil Green, who recruited Dr. Mencio to Vanderbilt.”

Mencio earned his medical degree and completed his orthopaedic surgery residency at Duke University. He completed a fellowship in pediatric orthopaedic surgery at Newington Children’s Hospital (now Connecticut Children’s Medical Center). He joined the faculty at VUMC in 1991.

Mencio has been chief of Pediatric Orthopaedics at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt since 2006. His areas of interest include scoliosis and spinal deformity, pediatric trauma, limb lengthening and orthopaedic aspects of neuromuscular disorders.

Throughout his career, Mencio has held positions in various other orthopaedic organizations, including serving on the board of directors and as chair of the Board of Specialty Societies of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and as president of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) and the Tennessee Orthopaedic Society.

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