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Academy for Excellence in Education elects 28 new members

Jun. 16, 2021, 2:02 PM

The Academy for Excellence in Education was established in November of 2006. The founding membership was comprised of 44 distinguished medical educators. The Academy provides a forum to foster higher levels of participation and promote excellence and scholarship in the delivery of education to health professionals.

The Academy is a collective of outstanding faculty educators in Vanderbilt University School of Medicine who are highly engaged in the educational mission. Each strives to have a significant impact on educational endeavors in diverse settings with a variety of learners.

The Academy for Excellence in Education has elected the following 28 new members for 2021.

Sharon E. Albers, MD, joined the faculty in 2017 and is an associate professor of Dermatology and director of Pediatric Dermatology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in course/curricula/program design and mentorship. She has developed several courses and curricula including pediatric dermatology in the Department of Dermatology, the Department of Pediatrics elective rotation in pediatric dermatology course and noon conference dermatology curriculum. With regard to programs, she established the Pediatric Tele-dermatology Program. She has mentored more than 50 students across multiple health professions and at many levels of training. In 2019 she was the recipient of the Lloyd E. King Jr. Excellence in Teaching Award, the Department of Dermatology’s highest award in Education

Nathan E. Ashby, MD, joined the faculty in 2008 and is an associate professor of Clinical Anesthesiology and associate professor of Nursing. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in educational leadership and program design. He has overseen the development of several educational programs in multiple schools and departments, including interns and residents in the Departments of Surgery, Internal Medicine, Neurosurgery, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and Emergency Medicine. His innovative form of teaching comes through the use of simulation at Vanderbilt’s Center for Experiential Learning and Assessment. His interdisciplinary approach to program development led to a secondary appointment at the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing for his contributions in the creation of novel programs for Advanced Practice Nursing.

Adriana Bialostozky, MD joined the faculty in 2004 and is an assistant professor of Pediatrics. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in teaching, educational leadership, and course/curricula/program design. She has demonstrated sustained excellence in teaching, receiving the highest ratings from the learners she works with. She has received the Continuity Clinic Experience Award annually since 2015. The innovative group care delivery model she developed provides a strong example of her clinical skills in a unique learning environment. The Spanish Language clinic she developed affords learners the experience of understanding social disparities and the importance of appreciating culture differences. Her work with the Advanced Clinical Elective through the clinic has allowed students to learn Spanish medical terminology, improve fluency in Spanish and learn about the Latino immigrant experience. In 2020 she received the VUMC Martin Luther King, Jr. Award.

Emily C. Bird, MD. MA joined the faculty in 2015 and is an assistant professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Neonatology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in teaching, educational leadership, and course/program design. She is a Curriculum 2.0 Case Based Learning (CBL) small group facilitator (SGF) who has been rated as one of the all-time best SGFs. She was recruited to become the director of the CBL Small Group Facilitator Program in 2018. In this role she provides SGF faculty development to learn the CBL method as well as on giving feedback to students. She also developed a program for student peer-to-peer, face-to face-feedback. The paper she published on this program was so well received it was featured as the paper of the month by the International Association of Medical Science Educators (IAMSE).

Clifford Bowens, Jr., MD, joined the faculty in 2005 and is an associate professor of Clinical Anesthesiology. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in teaching, course/program design and educational leadership. His trainee evaluations on his teaching place him in the top 5% of all faculty in the Department of Anesthesiology. He has been invited to speak at a number of national Anesthesia conferences and was invited to be the chairman of the Reginal Anesthesiology Workshop for the All-African Anesthesiology Conference in Kenya. He has created and implemented several courses which include two pain management-oriented courses. He designed and implemented the orthopedic anesthesia rotation for the anesthesiology residency and serves as the rotation director. He previously served as the Medical Director of Orthopedic Anesthesia and has been involved in numerous departmental and institutional committees.

Daisy A. Ciener, MD, MS joined the faculty in 2016 and is an assistant professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine (EM). She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership. She serves as the fellowship director for Pediatric EM. In this role she created a stimulation curriculum and restructured the fellowship education conference to the core educational content for the American Board of Pediatrics. She also serves as director of Simulation in the Department of EM and on the School of Medicine Promotions Committee, Foundations of Medical Knowledge. She has been selected to serve on two institutional level committees focused on Graduate Medical Education (GME): Pediatric Faculty Representative for the GME Committee and the Complement Committee. Her efforts have been recognized with the Andrea C. Bracikowski Teaching Award, an annual recognition by the Department of Emergency Medicine Residents for teaching excellence in the VCH Emergency Department.

Larry T. Davis, MD joined the faculty in 2014 and is an assistant professor, Department of Radiology. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in teaching and educational leadership. He is the current director of the Neuroradiology medical student Advanced Clinical Elective. He has also served on four VUMC Radiology Committees related to education including the Education Committee, Residency Recruitment Committee, Neuroradiology Fellowship Competency Committee and Residency Clinical Competency Committee. He has won several teaching awards, including both the Vanderbilt Radiology Fellow and Faculty Teacher of the Year as well as the Senior Residents Teaching Award.

Shannon C. Eastham, MD joined the faculty in 2012 and is an assistant professor in the Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in teaching and educational leadership. She is a VU School of Medicine Master Clinical Teacher in Surgery. In addition to being the course director for the School of Medicine’s Injury, Repair and Rehabilitation Immersion Course she is also director and instructor for courses in critical care and general surgery. Other educational leadership roles include serving as a member of the Surgical Education Leadership team and as associate program director for the General Surgery Residency program.

Etoi A. Garrison, MD, PhD joined the faculty in 2006 and is an associate professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership and curricula/program design. Current leadership roles include course director for both the sub-intern elective in Maternal Fetal Medicine and Advanced Clinical Elective in Obstetrics. On the residency level she revised and enhanced the labor and delivery curriculum. Additionally, she developed the current resident OB-emergency simulation program and on the national level has been recognized for her educational curriculum development, particularly in simulation training. In 2018-2019 she was elected to the APGO Scholars and Leaders cohort and received the APGO/CREOG Empower Award to develop a series of educational videos and a flipped classroom curriculum on opioid dependence in pregnancy. She is also the director of Diversity for Ob/Gyn and liaison to the VUMC Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. In this role she coordinates unconscious bias training for the Ob/Gyn faculty and residents.

Rachel H. Goode, MD joined the faculty in 2016 and is an assistant professor of Pediatrics, Division of Developmental Medicine. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership and curricula/program design. She directs the core residency rotation for Developmental Medicine, serves as the medical director for the Neonatal Developmental follow-up program and is the associate Director of the Vanderbilt Consortium Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities. She enhanced the implementation of the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Rotation for the Pediatric Residency Training Program at VUMC. She did so by helping develop an innovative curriculum that introduced e-learning modules, asynchronous learning activities, and active, hands-on experiences targeting enriched learning in autism spectrum disorder in the developmental-behavioral pediatrics rotation. In recognition of this work, she received the 2021 Geoffrey David Chazen Faculty Award for Innovation in Medical Education.

Alisa Gotte, MD, MSCS joined the faculty in 2015 and is an associate professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in teaching and educational leadership. Among her many teaching activities, she presents formal didactic lectures to medical students, residents, and fellows, as well as providing continuing medical education to community pediatricians and adult rheumatologists. She serves as the Pediatric Rheumatology fellowship director and director of the Pediatric Resident Rheumatology elective. On the national level she serves on American College of Rheumatology working groups in the field of graduate medical education, including the Pediatric Rheumatology Medical Knowledge Section Review for Core Curriculum Outline Working Group and Pediatric Rheumatology ViTL (Virtual Teaching Lesson) Educational Program.

Brian Hackett, MD, PhD joined the faculty in 2017 and is a professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in educational leadership and mentoring. Before joining the faculty here he served as the program director of the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Fellowship Program for 20 years and was director of the Office of Faculty Development in the Department of Pediatrics at Washington University School of Medicine. He then served as the interim fellowship program director at Vanderbilt shortly after his arrival. On the national level he was elected to serve on the council of the Organization of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Training Program Directors. During his career he has served as a formal and informal mentor to multiple trainees and junior faculty.

Dupree Hatch, MD, MPH joined the faculty in 2015 and is an assistant professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in teaching. He is dedicated to bedside teaching, where he works with medical students, residents and fellows and receives glowing learner evaluations. In addition to his bedside teaching, Dupree is one of the most frequent lecturers in the Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine (NPM) core curriculum as well as the Pediatric Subspecialty Fellowship Program Core Curriculum. NPM fellows recognized Dupree’s teaching by choosing him for the first annual William F. Walsh Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award, as the faculty member who most embodies Dr. Walsh’s dedication to the education of NPM trainees.

Alison Herndon, MD, MSPH joined the faculty in 2015 and is an assistant professor of Clinical Pediatrics, Division of Hospital Medicine. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership and mentorship. Her leadership roles include director for the Pediatric Hospital Medicine Resident Rotation, assistant program director for the Pediatric Residency Program as well as service on the Pediatrics Program Evaluation Committee and the Clinical Competency Committee. With regard to mentoring she co-directs the successful Intern Mentoring Program for the Pediatric Residency Program and helped establish the Pediatric Hospital Medicine Peer Mentoring Program.

Douglas Hester, MD, MFA joined the faculty in 2008 and is an associate professor of Anesthesiology. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in teaching, course design and educational leadership. He developed an OSCE course for Anesthesia senior residents as well as workshops and short courses for medical students, residents, and faculty for creative writing. He is the director of the Anesthesiology Residency Simulation Program and the Professional Development Rotation, a unique course that offers a range of speakers on important facets of professional life. His outstanding teaching has been recognized with multiple teaching awards, including 3 Volker L. Stiepe awards, which Anesthesia residents give annually to the faculty member they choose as “Best Teacher” as well as two Golden Apples Awards.

David P. Johnson, MD joined the faculty in 2012 and is an associate professor of Pediatrics, Division of Hospital Medicine. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in curricula design and mentorship. He helped launch the first cohort of the VUMC Quality Academy, a new Quality Improvement (QI) curriculum for faculty and staff. He also created and leads the Pediatric Residency Program QI Academic Community. In these leadership roles he has been able to mentor a number of mentees who have been able to successfully present and publish QI work nationally. In 2018 he received the VU School of Medicine Denis O’Day Faculty Award for team-implemented curriculum reform.

Charles Lei, MD joined the faculty in 2014 and is an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in teaching and educational leadership. He serves in multiple roles for School of Medicine Courses for the Department of Emergency Medicine (EM) including the EM Advanced Clinical Elective (ACE), EM Elective, Enhanced Experience in EM ACE, and Integrated Science Course: Cell to System Science. On the Graduate Medical Education level, he is the assistant director of the Division of EM Simulation. He created the curriculum and serves as Program Director for the EM Simulation Fellowship. His expertise as an educator is evidenced by his two Corey M. Slovis Emergency Medicine Awards: For bedside teaching in 2015 and didactic teaching in 2019.

Reid Longmuir, MD joined the faculty in 2015 and is an assistant professor of Ophthalmology. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in teaching and course design. In the School of Medicine, he serves as a Portfolio Coach and a small group CBL facilitator in the Brain, Behavior and Movement course. He helped develop The Enhanced Experience in Ophthalmology Advanced Clinical Elective and serves as the Neuro-Ophthalmology Education Liaison. He lectures extensively to residents in Ophthalmology and Neurology. Ophthalmology residents recognized his commitment to them with the Bridge Award in 2019. This honor is bestowed upon the faculty member who has most ably guided their path toward proficiency.

Daniel J. Moore, MD, PhD joined the faculty in 2010 and is an assistant professor of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology. He was elected to the Academy based on his excellence in educational leadership, curricular design, and mentorship. His educational leadership roles include Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship program director and program director of the Department of Pediatrics Pediatric Physician Scientist Development Program. He has held multiple key leadership roles in the School of Medicine, including Faculty Advising College Leader of Goodpasture College for the MSTP Program, Resident Advisor for Vivien Thomas (MSTP) Advising College, course director for a graduate course in Cellular and Molecular Immunology, and course creator/director for an Advanced Clinical Elective, Pediatric Diabetes in the Clinical and Research Settings. He has served as a mentor for numerous trainees and junior faculty.

Kendra H. Oliver, PhD joined the faculty in 2018 and is an assistant professor in Pharmacology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in program design and mentorship. She has developed four new programs which include the virtual version of the American Heart Association Supporting Undergraduate Research Experiences and the NHLBI funded Promoting Academic Excellence with Community Engagement and Reach Multicultural Scholars (PAECER) Program. She implemented facilitated versions of the programming at multiple collaborating institutions include Boston University, Stanford University, and The University of Minnesota Medical Center. She also developed multiple art-science programs including ArtLab and the Vanderbilt Institute for Infection, Immunology, and Inflammation (VI4) Artist in Residence Program. She has mentored over 36 students at the graduate and undergraduate level.

Lindsay Pagano, MD joined the faculty in and is an assistant professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership, program design and mentorship. She is the director of the Child Neurology Residency Program. In this role she instituted several changes in the program structure to expand the resident experience and education. She also serves on the Pediatrics Leadership Committee and the Pediatrics Program Education Committee, as well as the Adult Neurology Clinical Competency Committee and the Adult Neurology Program Evaluation Committee. She initiated a peer mentoring system for child neurology residents and has served as a mentor for trainees and junior faculty.

Heather A. Ridinger, MD MHPE joined the faculty in 2013 and is an assistant professor of Medicine. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership and program design. In the School of Medicine, she serves as a member of multiple committees including the Learning System Integration Team and the Undergraduate Medical Education Committee. Ridinger serves as part of the American Medical Association’s (AMA) Accelerating Change in Medical Education consortium team for Vanderbilt. She is the Co-Course Director of the Foundations of Healthcare Delivery (FHD), a novel longitudinal School of Medicine Curriculum 2.0 course she helped develop, implement, and teach. The FHD curriculum has been recognized by the AMA and received national acclaim. Ridinger serves as a consultant to multiple other institutions seeking to develop health systems science curricula.

Jill R. Slamon, MAT, MS joined the faculty in and 2011 and is a Senior associate in Obstetrics and Gynecology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership and program design. She is the founding assistant program director of the Master of Genetic Counseling Program. In this role she oversees the design and implementation of the curriculum and support clinical faculty with course instruction. She also serves on various committees including the Admission Committee, Progress and Promotion Committee, Advisory Board, and Curriculum Committee. She created and leads the Integrated Case Committee, helping develop and implement the case-based learning component of the curriculum. The American Board of Genetic Counseling invited her to serve on the Practice-Based Competency Task Force where she collaborates with leaders in genetic counseling education to restructure the Practice Based Competencies.

Lauren A. Sanlorenzo, MD, MPH, MST joined the faculty in 2018 and is an assistant professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in teaching and educational leadership. She has led small group learning on population and public health for School of Medicine students. She also led case-based teaching for the neonatal fellows and the pediatric residents in the NICU. She serves as the course director for the NICU rotation for the Pediatrics Residency program and is the director for the Patient and Family Engagement School of Medicine course. In 2020 she received the William F. Walsh Excellence in Clinical Teaching Award.

Jenna H. Sobey, MD joined the faculty in 2014 and is an assistant professor in Anesthesia. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in teaching, educational leadership, and program design. She has served as the associate program director for the Pediatric Anesthesiology Fellowship and assumed the role as program director in 2020. On the national level she serves on the Pediatric Anesthesia Program Director’s Association Committee and has been nominated to serve on several sub-committees. She developed a curriculum for a Pediatric Anesthesia Fellow Elective in Kenya, a Quality Improvement curriculum, and a multi-institutional Transition to Practice Bootcamp. She has also been involved in several global health education initiatives, including co-founding an e-learning platform, the Safe Pediatric Anesthesia Network.

Amy S. Whigham, MD, MS-HPEd joined the faculty in 2015 and is an assistant professor of Pediatric Otolaryngology. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership and program design. She has served as the director of Resident and Medical Student Education and Innovation in OHNS and as the Otolaryngology Medical Student Clerkship/Course Director. At the GME level Dr. Whigham has served as the faculty coordinator for the Pediatric Otolaryngology rotation for the Pediatric Residency Program. Whigham is a member of the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Education Committee. During the COVID-19 pandemic she developed, organized, and implemented both a virtual Town Hall and a longitudinal virtual educational experience (Vanderbilt Otolaryngology Online Medical Student Education [VOOMSE]) for medical students from other institutions.

Saralyn R. Williams, MD joined the faculty in 2006 and is an associate professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine, Medicine and Pediatrics. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership and teaching. She has served in several institutional and national leadership positions, including Immersion Phase Team Leader for Acting Internships and Advanced Clinical Electives and vice chair of Education, Department of Emergency Medicine. Her excellence in teaching has been recognized by outstanding learner ratings, numerous teaching awards and multiple invited speaker invitations for Grand Rounds, local, regional, and national conferences. Her most recent awards were in 2020: The VU School of Medicine Denis M. O’Day Award for Team-Implemented Curriculum Reform and the Corey M Slovis, MD Award for Excellence in Didactic Teaching, Department of Emergency Medicine.

Carmen C. Wolfe, MD joined the faculty in 2015 and is an assistant professor in Emergency Medicine. She was elected to the Academy based on her excellence in educational leadership and program design. She is the associate program director for the Emergency Medicine (EM) Residency program and serves on the EM Program Evaluation Committee and Clinical Competency Committee. In the Department of Emergency Medicine, she serves as the leader in curriculum design, implementation, and assessment. Curricula she has helped develop include a specific In-Training Exam Curriculum, a comprehensive EKG curriculum and a new curriculum called Evolution: MD to address the need for professional development.

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