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Radiothon fundraising event set for Dec. 11-12

Dec. 4, 2014, 9:19 AM

The 2014 Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals Radiothon benefiting Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt will take place Dec. 11-12.

Tune in to WRVW 107.5 The River for the “River of Hope Radiothon,” which will broadcast live from the performance stage at Children’s Hospital from 6 – 7 a.m. on both days.

On-air personalities will interview patients, families and hospital staff who will share their stories and experiences at Children’s Hospital. Listeners are encouraged to make a pledge to benefit the hospital.

Last year, the event raised more than $124,000 in two days.

Since 2005, the River of Hope Radiothon has raised more than $1.5 million in pledges and has unified the surrounding community by providing outstanding emotional and financial support to Children’s Hospital, the local CMN hospital.

For more information on the Radiothon visit childrenshospital.vanderbilt.org/radiothon.

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