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American Thoracic Society honors Ware’s research contributions

Feb. 12, 2015, 8:57 AM

Lorraine Ware, M.D., professor of Medicine and Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, will receive the American Thoracic Society’s (ATS) Recognition Award for Scientific Accomplishments at the society’s 2015 International Conference in Denver in May.

Lorraine Ware, M.D.

The Recognition Award is given to ATS members for outstanding scientific contributions in basic or clinical research to the understanding, prevention and treatment of acute or chronic lung diseases.

Those considered for the award are recognized for either scientific contributions throughout their careers or for major contributions at a particular point in their careers.

Ware’s laboratory is investigating the pathogenesis and resolution of acute respiratory distress syndrome with a goal of developing new therapies for this life threatening illness.

“It’s a tremendous honor for me to receive this award and I would like to acknowledge the many mentors, mentees and research staff who have contributed to our research efforts over the years,” Ware said.

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