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Division of Allergy Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Archives

Vanderbilt study finds that the most common oxygen saturation targets for hospitalized patients appear equally safe and effective

Oct. 24, 2022—A Vanderbilt study looked at the oxygen saturation target that results in optimal outcomes — number of days alive and free of mechanical ventilation — in 2,500 critically ill adults receiving mechanical ventilation.

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New target for lung fibrosis

Oct. 20, 2022—Blocking thromboxane-prostanoid receptor signaling protected animals from lung fibrosis in preclinical models, suggesting a new treatment for IPF — a chronic, progressive lung disorder that often kills within 3-5 years of diagnosis.

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Skin pigment affects oxygen monitor

Oct. 11, 2022—Black patients in the ICU were more likely to have low or high blood oxygen levels than white patients, even when a pulse oximeter indicated 92-96% oxygen saturation, Vanderbilt researchers found.

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Reduced exercise capacity in ICU survivors

Sep. 22, 2022—ICU survivors who have impaired exercise capacity months after discharge may have damaged muscle mitochondria — the energy powerhouses of the cell, Vanderbilt researchers propose.

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PheWAS reveals post-COVID-19 diagnoses

Sep. 8, 2022—Using a high-throughput informatics technique and electronic health records, Vanderbilt researchers found that COVID-19 survivors had an increased risk for more than 40 new diagnoses.

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Burn pit legislation hailed as a victory by physician who became veterans’ advocate

Aug. 10, 2022—President Joe Biden on Wednesday signed into law a broad expansion of health care benefits for millions of veterans exposed to toxic burn pits, and for Robert Miller, MD, professor of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and his Vanderbilt University Medical Center colleagues, the action is a long-awaited victory.

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Study shows success at disproving allergies to sulfa antibiotics

Aug. 4, 2022—A Vanderbilt study shows that physicians can successfully identify and disprove low-risk sulfa antibiotic allergies using an oral antibiotic challenge in consenting patients prior to solid organ transplant.

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Study explores role RSV plays in later asthma development

Jul. 21, 2022—A Vanderbilt clinical project will follow 1,950 Middle Tennessee children to determine how genes and the environment interact with RSV infection during the first year of life and contribute to asthma development

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Study seeks to disprove cephalosporin allergies

Jul. 7, 2022—A Vanderbilt study shows that taking a careful history in patients who report allergies to cephalosporins and separating them into risk categories can help identify which patients are at low risk to be truly allergic to these antibiotics.

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Study finds administering IV fluids during emergency tracheal intubation does not lower cardiac arrest risk

Jun. 20, 2022—Rapidly administering IV fluids to critically ill adults undergoing emergency tracheal intubation does not significantly decrease chances of hypotension (low blood pressure) and cardiac arrest, a Vanderbilt University Medical Center-led study shows.

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Study explores positioning options to improve COVID mortality

Jun. 2, 2022—Vanderbilt researchers found that prone positioning of patients with COVID-19-related hypoxemia not on mechanical ventilation offered no observed clinical benefit among these patients.

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ICU study confirms safety of delabeling penicillin allergies

Mar. 10, 2022—A Vanderbilt study shows that physicians can safely identify and disprove low-risk penicillin allergies using an oral amoxicillin challenge in consenting patients, even those in the intensive care unit who are recovering from critical illness.

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