Division of Allergy Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

Vanderbilt mourns loss of pulmonary medicine visionary James Snell Jr.

James D. Snell Jr., MD, who helped transform the field of pulmonary and critical care medicine during his 45-year career at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, died July 3 in Nashville.

Study shows video laryngoscope increases successful intubation on first attempt

A Vanderbilt study study comparing the two types of laryngoscopes used in tracheal intubation of critically ill patients showed that the use of a video laryngoscope increased successful intubation on the first attempt, compared to the use of a direct laryngoscope, the standard approach for almost a century.

From left, Frank Harrell Jr., PhD, Paul Harris, PhD, Wesley Self, MD, James Chappell, MD, PhD, Gordon Bernard, MD, Jana Shirey-Rice, PhD, and Jillian Rhoads, PhD, play key roles in a national effort to advance the understanding and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia and sepsis.

VUMC to coordinate national effort to reduce ARDS, pneumonia, sepsis

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has received a $31.6 million federal grant to lead a national effort to better understand acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia and sepsis.

Tracking lung macrophages

A new technique will allow researchers to track subsets of immune cells that patrol and defend the lungs, to better understand the roles of these cells during lung inflammation, infection and injury.

A clinical trial supports approval of a new medication to treat moderate-to-severe asthma in children.

Study finds early RSV infection linked to significantly increased risk of asthma in children

A Vanderbilt study has found that RSV infection in the first year of life is associated with a significantly increased risk of asthma in children.

The study found that some children with mystery digestive symptoms may actually have undiagnosed alpha-gal syndrome, commonly known as the red meat allergy linked to tick bites.

Children’s mystery symptoms may be alpha-gal syndrome

A Vanderbilt study found that some children with mystery digestive symptoms may actually have undiagnosed alpha-gal syndrome, commonly known as the red meat allergy linked to tick bites.

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