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Nine Vanderbilt nurses honored by March of Dimes Tennessee

Jan. 12, 2017, 8:41 AM

Nine nurses from Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN) received top honors at the March of Dimes Tennessee Chapter Nurse of the Year Awards, held on Dec. 12 at the Franklin Marriott Cool Springs.

The event, in its seventh year, recognizes nurses who embody leadership, compassion and excellence in patient care across nursing specialties.

Here are the Vanderbilt winners, by category:

Advanced Practice, Buffy Lupear, DNP, CRNA, APRN, VUMC
Graduate Student Nurse, Jennifer Neczypor, VUSN
Hospice and Palliative Care, Jill Nelson, MSN, APRN, VUMC
Nursing Administration, Sharon Holley, DNP, CNM, VUMC
Nursing Education, Natasha McClure, MSN, R.N., CPNP, VUSN
Pediatric, Amanda Lea, R.N., Monroe Carrell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt, VUMC
Quality and Risk Management, Rebekah Lemley, R.N., EMT, VUMC
Research, Julia Phillippi, Ph.D., CNM, VUSN
• Women’s Health, Elizabeth Munoz, MSN, APRN, CNM, VUMC

“It is my pleasure to congratulate these extraordinary nurses,” said Marilyn Dubree, MSN, R.N., NE-BC, Executive Chief Nursing Officer. “They represent an amazing caliber of talent throughout our Medical Center.”

Linda Norman, DSN, R.N., Valere Potter Menefee Professor of Nursing and dean of VUSN, said she is proud of all the VUSN and VUMC honorees. “Those recognized include VUSN faculty, alumnae and a student. They are outstanding professionals. We are happy to see that they were recognized for their accomplishments.”

The winners were chosen from more than 130 nominees who represented the March of Dimes’ vision for a healthier, stronger generation of babies and families.

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