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American Thoracic Society lauds Young’s contributions

Mar. 9, 2017, 9:38 AM

Lisa Young, M.D., associate professor of Pediatrics and Medicine in the Divisions of Pulmonary Medicine and Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, has been selected to receive this year’s American Thoracic Society (ATS) Public Advisory Roundtable Excellence Award.

Lisa Young, M.D.

The award is given to an individual, group or institution from any lay, professional or government field who has improved the lives of patients who have pulmonary disease by: enabling research and advancing the understanding of disease through legislation, advocacy or philanthropy; performing basic or clinical scientific works that have produced tangible and significant benefits for affected individuals; or providing vision, hope, support or relief to those with life–threatening pulmonary illness.

The award will be presented to Young during the ATS Public Advisory Roundtable symposium at the 2017 ATS International Conference. The symposium is Tuesday, May 23, at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington D.C.

“Dr. Lisa Young has dedicated her career to the study of rare lung diseases,” said Paul Moore, M.D., director of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics. This award recognizes her contributions as an advocate for families and their children in seeking advances in research and clinical care for the treatment of these rare diseases.”

Young is the director of the Rare Lung Diseases Program with clinics at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt and The Vanderbilt Clinic. She is also an associate professor in the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology. Young’s laboratory-based and patient-oriented research focuses on genetic and interstitial lung diseases. A primary interest of her lab is the role of the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages in the regulation of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis.

“I am tremendously honored to be selected for this award from the ATS,” Young said. “Vanderbilt provides a remarkable environment that supports physicians and scientists in their efforts to both conduct scientific research and improve patient care.

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