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glaucoma Archives

NEI grants help bolster glaucoma research efforts

Nov. 29, 2018—Two Vanderbilt Eye Institute (VEI) researchers were recently awarded National Eye Institute (NEI) Audacious Goals Initiative (AGI) for Regenerative Medicine grants for $6.8 million over five years to develop new treatments for optic neuropathies and glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness.

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Novel methods to treat glaucoma

Nov. 8, 2018—Increasing a certain signaling molecule prevents the degeneration of retinal cells that are lost in glaucoma, suggesting a new way to treat this disease.

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Aqueous humor, microRNAs and glaucoma

Apr. 10, 2018—New findings highlight microRNAs — molecules that regulate gene expression — that are differentially expressed in glaucoma and could be candidate biomarkers or targets for therapy.

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Glaucoma study finds brain fights to preserve vision

Feb. 22, 2018—A team of researchers, led by David Calkins, PhD, vice chair and director of Research at the Vanderbilt Eye Institute, has made a breakthrough discovery in the field of glaucoma showing new hopes for treatments to preserve vision.

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Cytokine linked to blindness

Jun. 30, 2017—A signaling molecule called interleukin-6 may be a therapeutic target to prevent vision loss or nerve degeneration in glaucoma, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

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Retinal neuron survival in glaucoma

Dec. 16, 2014—Understanding how the protein TRPV1 helps neurons survive after glaucoma-related stressors could lead to new therapeutic strategies for glaucoma and other neurodegenerative conditions.

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Regenerative visual neuroscience effort launched

Oct. 2, 2014—Vanderbilt University has launched a regenerative visual neuroscience initiative to develop new ways of treating — and restoring sight to — people who have been blinded by glaucoma, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and eye injuries.

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Protein boosts retinal neuron survival

Mar. 14, 2014—An ion channel protein called TRIPV1 helps retinal neurons survive the elevated eye pressure associated with glaucoma.

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Team tracking new options to treat glaucoma

Sep. 19, 2013—Three years ago, a team of researchers led by David Calkins, Ph.D., vice chair and director of Research at the Vanderbilt Eye Institute, showed that the first sign of injury in glaucoma, the leading cause of blindness in the United States, occurs in the brain.

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Glaucoma patients focus of Sousan’s sharing nature

Aug. 15, 2013—Suzanne Sousan is not afraid of much.

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Insights on glaucoma gene mutations

Jun. 26, 2013—Glaucoma-causing mutations in the gene for myocilin reduce secretion of the protein into the aqueous humor, suggesting a new option for treatment.

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NIH lauds Rex’s ideas for future of vision research

Feb. 14, 2013—Tonia Rex, Ph.D., assistant professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the Vanderbilt Eye Institute, was recently named one of 10 winners of the National Institutes of Health competition for ideas on the future of vision research.

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Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

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