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Media Advisory: Rally Across America to stop at Children’s Hospital

Jun. 26, 2008, 5:31 PM

What: Rally Across America, a non-profit charity bicycle race which raises money for childhood cancer research, visits the Hematology and Oncology Clinic at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt. The cycling team will bring one of its racing bikes to show pediatric oncology patients, as well as goody bags for them. The Rally, which covered several states and more than 1,000 miles, ends in Nashville that day.

When: Friday, June 27, at 9:15 a.m.

Details: One of the patients being honored by this year’s Rally is 20-month-old Colin Sanders, who is fighting neuroblastoma at Children’s Hospital. He had had multiple surgeries, six rounds of chemotherapy and a stem cell transplant, with radiation therapy yet to come.

Since its founding in 2006, the Rally Across America has raised more than $150,000. Its cyclists have pedaled more than 6,000 miles and visited 25 children’s hospitals. This year, the Rally Foundation will award grants totaling $300,000 to research groups, including one to Children’s Hospital to study acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Pediatric cancer is the leading cause of death by disease in U.S. children under age 15.

Where: Front entrance of Children’s Hospital, 2200 Childrens Way. Park in the attached South Garage and come to the hospital’s main entrance on the first floor.

Media Contact: Laurie Holloway, (615) 322-4747
laurie.e.holloway@vanderbilt.edu


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