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Chandra named editor of otolaryngology research journal

Nov. 14, 2019, 11:07 AM

 

by Kelsey Herbers

Rakesh Chandra, MD, professor of Otolaryngology and chief of Rhinology and Skull Base Surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, has been appointed editor-in-chief of Ear, Nose & Throat Journal, a monthly publication that highlights scientific research relevant to clinical care in the field of otolaryngology.

Rakesh Chandra, MD

The journal, published by SAGE Publishing, is one of several non-subspecialty-specific publications that appeals to general otolaryngologists.

Articles are peer-reviewed and often describe unusual cases or innovative approaches to treatment and case management.

The publication receives an average of 400 submissions annually and employs an editorial board of more than 60 people.

“I’m excited about this opportunity to evolve the strategy and direction of this journal and to represent VUMC’s Department of Otolaryngology on a national level,” said Chandra. “I hope to make this a landing spot for clinical and basic science that will be relevant and appreciated by the average ear, nose and throat specialist.”

Prior to this appointment, Chandra served eight consecutive years as co-editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy. His new appointment will last three years.

“Rick has exceled in many roles and he now will, as editor, enhance a journal that reaches every otolaryngologist,” said Roland Eavey, MD, Guy M. Maness Professor and chair of Otolaryngology and director of the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center. “Vanderbilt can be proud of this announcement and the ongoing positive impact that will occur for years to come.”

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