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Applications sought for Transplant Infectious Diseases/Immunocompromised Host Fellowship Program

Dec. 16, 2019, 4:39 PM

 

by Paul Govern

The Division of Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center is seeking applicants for its new Transplant Infectious Diseases/Immunocompromised Host (TID/ICH) Fellowship Program.

The 12-month program, directed by Gowri Satyanarayana, MD, assistant professor of Medicine, plans to induct its first fellow on July 1, 2020.

Gowri Satyanarayana, MD

The TID/ICH fellow will interact with all transplant teams. Clinical duties will include six months on the inpatient TID service and two half-days of TID clinic.

Research can be tailored to the fellow’s interests, with opportunities ranging from antimicrobial stewardship and multi-disciplinary database analysis to bench microbiology and translational microbiomics. Additional opportunities include writing scientific manuscripts and presenting at multidisciplinary conferences.

Each year VUMC performs more than 500 solid organ transplants — heart, liver, lung, kidney, pancreas — 200 hematopoietic cell transplants (establishing marrow and immune function), 200 induction chemotherapy treatments (a first line cancer therapy), and, for patients with weakened hearts, 80 ventricular assist device placements.

The successful candidate will have completed an accredited Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program. Applications are due Jan. 15, 2020 to Nora Gilgallon Keele (nora.m.gilgallon-keele@vumc.org). Send inquires to Satyanarayana at gowri.satyanarayana@vumc.org.

 

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