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Student research lauded at informatics symposium

Dec. 19, 2019, 10:53 AM

 

by Paul Govern

Two studies from Vanderbilt University Medical Center took awards at the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) Annual Symposium, held recently in Washington, D.C.

Sharon Davis, MS, a doctoral candidate in Biomedical Informatics, won AMIA’s prestigious Student Paper Competition for a study titled, “Comparison of Prediction Model Performance Updating Protocols: Using a Data-Driven Testing Procedure to Guide Updating.” Oral presentation was part of the competition, with Davis as one of eight finalists invited to present their research.

Davis is the third Vanderbilt student to have taken top honors in the annual competition, which started in 1981. Her co-authors include Robert Greevy, PhD, Thomas Lasko, MD, PhD, Colin Walsh, MD, MA, and Michael Matheny, MD, MS, MPH. The study was sponsored in part by the National Institutes of Health (LM007450).

Another paper from Vanderbilt received AMIA’s Distinguished Paper Award, one of four papers to be thus honored this year. The study, “Biomedical Research Cohort Membership Disclosure on Social Media,” was led by Yongtai Liu, a doctoral candidate in Computer Science, and Bradley Malin, PhD, professor of Biomedical Informatics, Biostatistics and Computer Science.

Their co-authors include Chao Yan, MS; Zhijun Yin, PhD; Zhiyu Wan, MS; Weiyi Xia, PhD; Murat Kantarcioglu, PhD; Yevgeniy Vorobeychik, PhD; and Ellen Wright Clayton, MD, JD. The study was sponsored in part by the National Institutes of Health (HG009034, OD023196).

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