sepsis

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Acetaminophen shows promise in warding off acute respiratory distress syndrome, organ injury in patients with sepsis

Findings from NIH-supported clinical trial suggest that intravenous acetaminophen has the greatest benefit in the sickest patients.

How to get the biggest “bang” for the research “buck”

Vanderbilt researchers are developing new methods to maximize what can be learned from clinical trials and cohort studies, while maintaining their rigor and reproducibility.

The team studying how to control sepsis in the lungs and kidneys includes, from left, Huan Qiao, MD, PhD Jacek Hawiger, MD, PhD, Jozef Zienkiewicz, PhD, and Yan Liu, MD, MS. (photo by Erin O. Smith)

Study reveals genomic code for sepsis in the lungs and kidneys

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the Nashville Veterans Affairs Medical Center have “cracked” the genomic code for sepsis in the lungs and kidneys.

Persistent inflammatory state found in half of pediatric sepsis deaths: study

New research shows that about half of pediatric patients who died of sepsis over the past 20 years at Vanderbilt University Medical Center had evidence of an inflammatory state called persistent inflammation, immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome.

From left, Frank Harrell Jr., PhD, Paul Harris, PhD, Wesley Self, MD, James Chappell, MD, PhD, Gordon Bernard, MD, Jana Shirey-Rice, PhD, and Jillian Rhoads, PhD, play key roles in a national effort to advance the understanding and treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia and sepsis.

VUMC to coordinate national effort to reduce ARDS, pneumonia, sepsis

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has received a $31.6 million federal grant to lead a national effort to better understand acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia and sepsis.

Andrew Wiese, MPH, PhD, left, Carlos Grijalva, MD, MPH, and colleagues found that the risk of a heart attack diagnosis was highest in the first week after onset of pneumococcal infection.

Serious pneumococcal infections increase the risk of heart attack

A Vanderbilt study found that patients with serious pneumococcal infections, including pneumonia and sepsis, are at a substantially increased risk of heart attack after the onset of infection.

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