Skip to main content

Cell entry ports for cold virus

Sep. 25, 2012, 7:00 AM

Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) – major causes of serious respiratory disease – use a fusion (F) protein to bind to and infect target cells. Understanding how the F protein works could point to ways to disable it and prevent infection.

In previous studies, Reagan Cox, John Williams, M.D., associate professor of Pediatrics, and colleagues demonstrated that the HMPV F protein contained an “RGD” motif, which was recognized by an integrin receptor on the host cell surface.

(iStock)

In the Journal of Virology, they now report that the HMPV F protein binds to multiple types of RGD-binding integrin receptors and mediates virus binding and fusion, without a separate viral attachment protein. They showed that the F protein RGD motif is critical for infection (viruses without this motif were impaired). They also found that F-integrin binding was required for productive viral transcription (copying of the viral genome).

The results suggest a stepwise mechanism of HMPV cell entry mediated by the F protein through its interactions with cellular receptors, including RGD-binding integrins.

This research was supported by grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (AI073697, AI085062, AI007611), the National Cancer Institute (CA9682), and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (RR024975) of the National Institutes of Health.

Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

Momentum

Sharon Seibert is among the more than 5,000 patients who have received a stem cell transplant at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, which has one of the best survival rates in the nation and is at the forefront of new cellular therapies.

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

more