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Ultrasound Section of Radiology receives AIUM re-accreditation

Sep. 19, 2013, 9:13 AM

The Ultrasound Section of Vanderbilt’s Department of Radiology recently received maximum length re-accreditation through the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, the largest ultrasound organization in the world.

The re-accreditation recognizes that the sonographic exams in the department are of the highest quality and in several areas set the standards for sonographic studies performed throughout the country.

The ultrasound section at Vanderbilt includes 28 sonographers and eight staff radiologists that provide 24/7 service to Vanderbilt University Hospital and five outpatient facilities including the Centers for Women’s Imaging (West End Avenue and Vanderbilt Health One Hundred Oaks) and Vanderbilt Franklin Women’s Center.

More than 50,000 examinations per year are performed on state-of-the-art equipment.
The Ultrasound Section also operates a Sonography Training Program.

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