Skip to main content

New target for breast cancer therapy

Jul. 31, 2014, 8:48 AM

The protein MTBP is important for growth and survival of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) – a clinically aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is commonly resistant to targeted therapeutics – Vanderbilt investigators have discovered.

Using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, Christine Eischen, Ph.D., MSTP student Brian Grieb, Ph.D., and colleagues found that MTBP is overexpressed in breast cancer, with the highest levels in TNBC. They demonstrated that MTBP levels were elevated in a panel of human TNBC cell lines, and that reducing MTBP levels caused cell death and reduced tumor growth in vitro and in vivo in animal models, including in established tumors.

The researchers also found that MTBP is a novel regulator of MYC, an oncogenic factor that is overexpressed in 70 percent of human cancers. They showed that MTBP associates with MYC and increases MYC-mediated cell growth and tumor development.

The findings, published in two papers in Molecular Cancer Research and Cancer Research, position MTBP as a novel therapeutic target for human cancer, including TNBC.

This research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (AG039164, GM007347, CA148950, CA098131, TR000445, CA068485, CA119925).

Send suggestions for articles to highlight in Aliquots and any other feedback about the column to aliquots@vanderbilt.edu

Recent Stories from VUMC News and Communications Publications

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Hope

The first few minutes of Charlie’s life were a blur, as a team of doctors and nurses at VUMC worked to resuscitate him and stabilize his heart rate. He was then transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Vanderbilt Nurse

Tucked away in a Vanderbilt conference room, 36 adults huddle over Lego pieces. Eleven teams have been assigned to assemble multicolored Legos using the written directions included in the packet. The result should be a Frankenstein figure.

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

Vanderbilt Medicine

Marissa Benchea has CF, and she is one of hundreds of thousands of adults not only surviving but thriving with a chronic childhood disease.

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

Vanderbilt Medicine

One hundred years ago, multiple “waves” of a deadly flu swept across the world.

more