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Harris honored by American Medical Informatics Association

Nov. 19, 2015, 9:22 AM

Paul Harris, Ph.D., MS, professor of Biomedical Informatics and Engineering, has received the Donald A.B. Lindberg Award for Innovation in Informatics from the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA).

Paul Harris, Ph.D., MS

The award recognizes individuals who make advancements that “dramatically move or change the field” of biomedical informatics and are widely adopted on a national or international level.

The award was presented Nov. 15 in San Francisco during AMIA’s annual symposium.

“We congratulate Dr. Harris on his exceptional accomplishments and thank him for his esteemed influence on the field of informatics,” said AMIA Chair Blackford Middleton, M.D., MPH, M.Sc.
The award announcement from AMIA summarizes Harris’s interests as spanning “novel strategies for data collection, analysis and dissemination in patient-oriented and translational research; noninvasive methods for determination of physiological properties; and software collaboration and dissemination models.”

Harris devised and launched REDCap, a human subjects research data collection and management software platform that has been adopted by some 1,660 institutions in 94 countries. He also created and runs ResearchMatch, a national program designed to match people who want to volunteer in studies and scientists recruiting participants for research. The ResearchMatch program is currently serving 85,000 volunteers and 3,400 researchers across 113 institutions.

AMIA has given this award annually since 2005 and Vanderbilt faculty members have received three of the 11 awards given so far. In 2005, the first Lindberg Award for Innovation was given to William Stead, M.D., associate vice chancellor for Health Affairs and chief strategy officer for VUMC, McKesson Foundation Professor of Biomedical Informatics and professor of Medicine. And in 2007 the award was given to Randy Miller, M.D., Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Biomedical Informatics and University Professor of Biomedical Informatics, Medicine and Nursing.

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