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Ehrenfeld named secretary of AMA’s board of trustees

Jun. 22, 2017, 9:02 AM

Jesse Ehrenfeld, M.D., MPH, professor of Anesthesiology, Surgery, Biomedical Informatics and Health Policy, was named secretary of the American Medical Association (AMA) board of trustees for 2017-2018 following elections held during the Annual Meeting of the AMA House of Delegates.

Jesse Ehrenfeld, M.D., MPH

“I have been fortunate to hold a number of leadership positions within the organization and I was delighted that my colleagues on the board chose me to be the next secretary, which I think is just recognition of some success I’ve been able to have in bringing the organization forward over the years. I’m looking forward to doing what I can to advance the mission of the association,” said Ehrenfeld, director of Education Research – Office of Health Sciences Education, director of the Program for LGBTI Health and associate director of Vanderbilt Anesthesiology & Perioperative Informatics Research Division.

Ehrenfeld became involved in the AMA in 2000, during his first year of medical school in Chicago, where the organization is headquartered.

“At the end of my first year in medical school, I attended my first annual meeting where the association comes together to discuss policy, and I found a group of people deeply committed to advancing the art and science of medicine and improving public health. I decided that this was a place where I wanted to put some effort to make an impact on the way medicine is practiced across the country.”

As secretary of the AMA board of trustees, Ehrenfeld is a member of the executive committee, responsible for helping to set direction for the organization.

At the annual meeting, David Barbe, M.D., MHA, a family physician from Mountain Grove, Missouri, was sworn in as the 172th president of the AMA, and Barbara McAneny, M.D., an oncologist from Albuquerque, New Mexico, was elected president-elect.

Members of the AMA board of trustees are elected by physicians and medical students representing more than 190 state and specialty medical societies. They gathered in Chicago this week for the annual meeting of the House of Delegates, the AMA’s policymaking body. The mission of the AMA is to promote the art and science of medicine and the betterment of public health.

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