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Award honors Donahue’s long-term efforts to improve children’s vision

Aug. 17, 2017, 9:23 AM

Sean Donahue, M.D., Ph.D., Sam and Darthea Coleman Professor of Pediatric Ophthalmology at Vanderbilt, recently received the Bonnie Strickland Champion for Children’s Vision Award.

Sean Donahue, M.D., Ph.D.

The award, presented during the National Center for Children’s Vision and Eye Health at Prevent Blindness annual meeting, honors Strickland’s groundbreaking work to establish a comprehensive system for children’s vision care in the United States and recognizes significant efforts to improve children’s vision and eye health at the state and national levels.

Donahue, professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the Vanderbilt Eye Institute, was selected for his efforts to improve children’s vision and for his work in the advancement of vision screening technology.

“I am honored to receive this award as it is recognition of the contribution our team at Vanderbilt and the Tennessee Lions have made during the last 25 years,” said Donahue. “Our screening advances have led to early detection of visual problems and in turn improved the opportunity for success in the classroom as well as on the field.”

Prevent Blindness, founded in 1908, is the nation’s leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight. Donahue is the third recipient of the award.

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