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Journal of Clinical Investigation Archives

Study reveals role for stem cells in chronic lung diseases

May. 25, 2017—A novel population of lung stem cells plays an important role in regulating the pulmonary microvasculature — the network of tiny blood vessels where oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange takes place.

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Vanderbilt-led study shows high-salt diet decreases thirst, increases hunger

Apr. 18, 2017—Salted peanuts make you thirsty so you drink more: that’s bartender wisdom. While that may be true in the short-term, within 24 hours increasing salt consumption actually makes you less thirsty because your body starts to conserve and produce water.

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EGF receptor found to regulate macrophage inflammation in gut

Oct. 13, 2016—Researchers at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine have uncovered a link between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and the inflammatory response to bacterial infection in the gastrointestinal tract.

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Study sheds light on link between autism, GI issues

Apr. 28, 2016—Researchers at Columbia and Vanderbilt universities have made an important discovery in mice that has implications for understanding the gastrointestinal (GI) problems experienced by some children with autism.

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Study identifies new culprit in lung cancer development

Jan. 27, 2016—A microRNA — a small piece of RNA involved in regulating gene expression — functions as an oncogene to drive the development of lung cancer, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered.

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Study sheds light on side effects of COX-2 drugs

Oct. 22, 2015—A team of Vanderbilt University Medical Center scientists are closer to understanding why COX-2 inhibitors — drugs that relieve arthritis pain and inflammation without the gastrointestinal side effects of other painkillers — cause heart problems in some patients. Now

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VUMC study shifts thinking on how bone fractures heal

Aug. 13, 2015—New findings show that fibrin, a protein that was thought to play a key role in fracture healing, is not required, shifting understanding of how fractures heal.

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Study explores protein’s role in inflammation-associated cancer

Jul. 23, 2015—An antioxidant protein may protect against colon cancer that develops in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting new strategies for reducing colon cancer risk in these patients.

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Study: Why one kidney can work as well as two

Jun. 11, 2015—Vanderbilt University researchers have come closer to solving a mystery that has puzzled scientists for more than a century: after the loss of one kidney, what causes the growth of the remaining kidney to take up the slack?

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‘Redesigned’ antibodies may control HIV: study

May. 21, 2015—With the help of a computer program called “Rosetta,” researchers at Vanderbilt University have “redesigned” an antibody that has increased potency and can neutralize more strains of the AIDS-causing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than can any known natural antibody.

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Team tracks how kidney responds to blood pressure meds

Apr. 30, 2015—Changes in the kidney can limit the blood pressure-lowering effects of thiazide diuretics, a new study reports.

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Gene variant, environment can boost RSV severity

Apr. 2, 2015—A particular genetic mutation combined with an urban environment increases the risk of severe disease in children infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), an international team of investigators has found.

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