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Longaker set for Discovery Lecture

Oct. 9, 2014, 10:13 AM

Michael Longaker, M.D., well known for his contributions to tissue repair and engineering and stem cell biology at Stanford University School of Medicine, will deliver the next Flexner Discovery Lecture on Thursday, Oct. 16.

Michael Longaker, M.D.

A member of the Institute of Medicine, Longaker directs the Stanford Program in Regenerative Medicine and the Children’s Surgical Research Program.

His lecture begins at 4 p.m. in 208 Light Hall, and is entitled “Minimizing Scarring: A Journey from Bench to Bedside.” It is sponsored by the Section of Surgical Sciences.

As an undergraduate, Longaker played basketball at Michigan State, where he backed up All-America point guard Earvin “Magic” Johnson. He played in the NCAA Championship-winning game on March 26, 1979, when the Johnson-led Spartans defeated Larry Bird-led Indiana State, 75-64.

A graduate of Harvard Medical School, Longaker completed a plastic surgery residency at New York University (NYU) and a craniofacial surgery fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles, and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of California, San Francisco.

Longaker served on the faculty of NYU and its Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery before coming to Stanford in 2000. His current research interests include the application of multipotent mesenchymal cells derived from adipose tissue to repair, replace and regenerate tissue.

For a complete schedule of the Flexner Discovery Lecture series and archived video of previous lectures, go to www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/discoveryseries.

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