cardiovascular (heart) disease

The study could suggest ways to promote the transport of phospholipids and cholesterol out of macrophages, immune system cells that play key roles in all stages of atherosclerosis development.

Reminders for clinicians improve prescribing for high cholesterol

A Vanderbilt study found that automated targeted reminders for clinicians helped increase prescribing of high intensity statins for patients with various atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease diagnoses, including coronary or peripheral artery disease and ischemic stroke.

The study found that chronically disrupted sleep and highly variable sleep durations night after night may increase the risk for atherosclerosis.

Study finds chronically disrupted sleep may increase risk for heart disease

Vanderbilt research found that sleep irregularity — chronically disrupted sleep and highly variable sleep durations night after night — may increase the risk for atherosclerosis.

The research team included, from left, Hannah Poisner, Sydney Olson, J. Brett Heimlich, MD, PhD, Ningning Hu, MS, Alyssa Parker, Alexander Bick, MD, PhD, Joseph Van Amburg and Tara Mack.

Researchers clarify role of blood cell mutations in disease

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new method to analyze mutations in blood stem cells that can trigger explosive, clonal expansions of abnormal cells.

Study finds heart failure risk higher in rural areas

A study co-led by Vanderbilt researchers found heart failure risk is 19% higher for adults living in rural areas of the U.S., as compared to urban areas, and 34% higher for Black men living in rural areas.

Study may lead to new diabetes, heart disease treatments

Vanderbilt research found that deletion of an autophagy-participating factor named PIK3C3 from the fat cells of mice led to compromised body temperature control, abnormal blood lipid levels, fatty liver and diabetes.

Reduced kidney function may cause cardiovascular disease: study

An international team of investigators has found that mild to moderate reduction in kidney function may cause cardiovascular disease, even in people without symptoms of heart disease or diabetes.

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