Circulation (journal)

The study could suggest ways to promote the transport of phospholipids and cholesterol out of macrophages, immune system cells that play key roles in all stages of atherosclerosis development.

Reminders for clinicians improve prescribing for high cholesterol

A Vanderbilt study found that automated targeted reminders for clinicians helped increase prescribing of high intensity statins for patients with various atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease diagnoses, including coronary or peripheral artery disease and ischemic stroke.

Study sheds new light on hormone therapy as menopause treatment

Vanderbilt research shows that hormone replacement therapy can be safely administered depending on the method used and the patient’s age, time since menopause, and risk of cardiovascular disease.

The research team included, from left, Hannah Poisner, Sydney Olson, J. Brett Heimlich, MD, PhD, Ningning Hu, MS, Alyssa Parker, Alexander Bick, MD, PhD, Joseph Van Amburg and Tara Mack.

Researchers clarify role of blood cell mutations in disease

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new method to analyze mutations in blood stem cells that can trigger explosive, clonal expansions of abnormal cells.

Reduced kidney function may cause cardiovascular disease: study

An international team of investigators has found that mild to moderate reduction in kidney function may cause cardiovascular disease, even in people without symptoms of heart disease or diabetes.

Studies by Andrew Glazer, PhD, Giovanni Davogustto, MD, and colleagues found that genetic testing with information from electronic health records can reveal undiagnosed heart rhythm disorders.

Studies combine genetic testing, electronic health records to find undiagnosed diseases

Combining genetic testing with information from electronic health records revealed undiagnosed heart rhythm disorders and new conditions associated with inherited cancer gene mutations.

VUMC researchers find clue to drug-induced arrhythmias

Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have made a fundamental discovery about how the heart compensates for genetic variations that otherwise could trigger abnormal and potentially fatal heart rhythms.

1 2